Special Meeting. Third Session, 27th May, 10 O'Clock, A. M

1843 Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society  
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more » ... out Early Journal Content at http://about.jstor.org/participate--jstor/individuals/early-journal--content. JSTOR is a digital library of academic journals, books, and primary source objects. JSTOR helps people discover, use, and build upon a wide range of content through a powerful research and teaching platform, and preserves this content for future generations. JSTOR is part of ITHAKA, a not--for--profit organization that also includes Ithaka S+R and Portico. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org. 67 pute it with some approach to accuracy, by more than one method. While the breadth of the crust-waves must vary with the energy of the earthquake, it can be shown to have been, in some of the more violent of these convulsions, enormously great; in the earthquake of Conception probably ten or eleven miles, and in that of Lisbon as much as twenty-five miles. Professor Rogers concluded by stating, that the lateness of the hour induced him to withhold the sequel of his paper, the design of which was to apply the generalizations which he had presented, to the explanation of the origin of those great flexures of the strata so magnificently displayed in the mountain chain of the United States; and he announced his purpose to resume the subject at some more appropriate season. SPECIAL MEETING. Third Session, 27th May, 10 o'clock, A. M. Dr. PATTERSON, Vice-President, in the Chair, The Secretaries presented a letter addressed to them by Mr. Sears C. Walker, and Professor E. Otis Kendall, of the High School, "On the Great Comet of 1843." This letter is dated High School Observatory, May 27, 1843, and, omitting a few paragraphs, is as follows:- Gentlemen,--We avail ourselves of the centennial meeting of the members of this Society to lay before them, generally, the reasons which induce us to believe that the recent visiter is a comet of short period, only 21 years, and that it is identical with those of February, 1668, and of December, 1689. An early suggestion of its identity with that of 1668 was made, we believe, by Prof. Peirce, in a lecture delivered at Boston on the 23d of March last. Shortly before that date, viz. March 20, it appears to have been noticed by Mr. Cooper, of Nice, in a letter to Schumacher, published in. the London Times. The question of their identity has been discussed by Prof. Schumacher and Mr. Petersen, of Altona. The latter applies Galle's elements to the perihelion passage in 1668, and Prof. Schumacher expresses an opinion in favour of their identity. The subject has been more fully discussed by Mr. Henderson, the Astronomer Royal pute it with some approach to accuracy, by more than one method. While the breadth of the crust-waves must vary with the energy of the earthquake, it can be shown to have been, in some of the more violent of these convulsions, enormously great; in the earthquake of Conception probably ten or eleven miles, and in that of Lisbon as much as twenty-five miles. Professor Rogers concluded by stating, that the lateness of the hour induced him to withhold the sequel of his paper, the design of which was to apply the generalizations which he had presented, to the explanation of the origin of those great flexures of the strata so magnificently displayed in the mountain chain of the United States; and he announced his purpose to resume the subject at some more appropriate season. SPECIAL MEETING.
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