Structure and Functions of Contractile Proteins. Boris F. Poglazov. Translated from the Russian edition (Moscow, 1965) by Scripta Technica. Academic Press, New York, 1966. 339 pp., illus. $17

E. W. Taylor
1967 Science  
errors in the text, however, although these are troublesome only in a few instances, where physical units are quoted incorrectly. The subject of plant-water relationships lends itself to a combined ecological-physiological approach. It is rare to find a book which integrates these two subjects so well. The author is particularly well qualified to write about them, having contributed extensively to the literature of both fields. The book is a major addition to earlier works which, though less
more » ... ich, though less biophysically based, are still important summaries of plant-water relations. There can be little doubt, however, that in the future we will see more of Slatyer's approach and, one hopes, will have an increasingly healthy combination of the two points of view. from the Russian edition (Moscow, 1965) by Scripta Technica. Academic Press, New York, 1966. 339 pp., illus. $17. The ability to produce controlled movements is one of the fundamental properties of living organisms. Even though a large number of apparently different motile systems have been described, ranging from the slow streaming of protoplasm to the high-frequency oscillations of insect flight muscle, it is reasonable to suppose th!at one is dealing with a class of phenomena exhibiting common features and evolutionary relationships. This book is probably the first attempt to provide a unified treatment of the broad area of motile systems. It deals primarily with the question, Is there a group of proteins with common properties which could be referred to as "contractile proteins"? A translation of a 1965 Russian edition, the book covers the literature in detail up to the end of 1963. The translation is adequate but often awkward, and one gains the impression that the lauthor's exact meaning has errors in the text, however, although these are troublesome only in a few instances, where physical units are quoted incorrectly. The subject of plant-water relationships lends itself to a combined ecological-physiological approach. It is rare to find a book which integrates these two subjects so well. The author is particularly well qualified to write about them, having contributed extensively to the literature of both fields. The book is a major addition to earlier works which, though less biophysically based, are still important summaries of plant-water relations. There can be little doubt, however, that in the future we will see more of Slatyer's approach and, one hopes, will have an increasingly healthy combination of the two points of view.
doi:10.1126/science.158.3805.1172 fatcat:fm2flywt2fc6jmfou4igfrqncy