The Attractive Christ and Other Sermons. Robert Stuart MacArthur

Lathan A. Crandall
1898 The American Journal of Theology  
its inner conflicts, its purposes, and its agencies. The federation itself is an expression of the union of interests in the Protestant churches of Germany on behalf of the various Lutheran confessions, and in opposition to the dreaded encroachments of ultramontane influences in the state. The pamphlet requires in the reader a previous knowledge of the ecclesiastical, dogmatic, and political parties of the German empire. The author explains the motives, the positions, and the arguments of the
more » ... arguments of the men who have composed the federation. Attempts at union have provoked criticism of partisans, and called out charges of disloyal compromise, and the historical review is really an apology for the participants. The booklet is a fragment of historical materials prepared by a well-informed participant in the movement.-C. R. HENDERSON. Co., 1898; pp. vi + I49; $I.) The five addresses, sent forth to the public in this volume, were delivered by Bishop Potter, of New York, on different occasions, "at the service for women engaged in church work." They were informal discourses, unwritten, save a few heads, and have just that degree of finish with which the spontaneous thoughts of a scholar naturally clothe themselves. The subjects discussed are very important and practical. "The Great Exemplar," "The Realm of Order," "Ends and Instruments," "Illusions and Ideals," and "Wholeness," are weighty topics, unfolded with directness, simplicity, clearness, and rare good sense. These addresses were an inspiration to those who heard them, and in their printed form will stimulate and help a multitude of readers.-GALUSHA ANDERSON. The Attractive Christ and Other Sermons. He is one of the most popular preachers in his denomination, and has built up one of the largest congregations in New York. The present volume contains twenty sermons, which may be taken as fairly representative of his average pulpit work. While Dr. MacArthur's success is due, in no small measure, to his strong and winning personality, his sermons, even when disassociated from the man, explain the preacher's popularity. They are plain, direct, earnest, evangelical. Some of its inner conflicts, its purposes, and its agencies. The federation itself is an expression of the union of interests in the Protestant churches of Germany on behalf of the various Lutheran confessions, and in opposition to the dreaded encroachments of ultramontane influences in the state. The pamphlet requires in the reader a previous knowledge of the ecclesiastical, dogmatic, and political parties of the German empire. The author explains the motives, the positions, and the arguments of the men who have composed the federation. Attempts at union have provoked criticism of partisans, and called out charges of disloyal compromise, and the historical review is really an apology for the participants. The booklet is a fragment of historical materials prepared by a well-informed participant in the movement.-C. R. HENDERSON.
doi:10.1086/477029 fatcat:4rwlnp4wmbhdpmce5a6oh4rpgu