COMPLEMENT FIXATION IN PERTUSSIS

MIRIAM OLMSTEAD
1915 Archives of Internal Medicine  
Since Bordet and Gengou in 19061 announced the discovery of the etiological cause of whooping cough, basing their claim mainly on the complement fixation reactions given by the serum of whooping cough convalescents, complement fixation has been studied by many serologists both from an etiological and from a diagnostic standpoint. Bordet and Gengou used as antigen a saline emulsion of a culture of the Bordet-Gengou bacillus on solid medium. Four hours at room temperature were allowed for
more » ... allowed for fixation, and readings were made the following day. In later publications2 the constancy of a positive complement fixation reaction among convalescents is reaffirmed, but no figures are given. The work of Bordet and Gengou has been confirmed more or less completely by some investigators and by others their claim has been declared invalid. Meier3 found the serum of pertussis patients to react with an extract of the lung tissue of patients dying of pertussis. Arnheim4 using an antigen of the Bordet-Gengou bacillus, obtained positive reactions in six out of twelve cases and thought imperfect technic might account for the lack of a positive reaction in the other cases. In a later publication5 he stated that these twelve cases were tested again and also three others, and that by making the readings immediately instead of on the following day, as before, he obtained a positive reaction in twelve of the fifteen. The antigen consisted of an equeous emulsion heated at 58 to 60 C. for one hour, shaken on the following day for three hours and centrifuged. Fraenkel6 tested the serum of five pertussis convalescents against an antigen of the Bordet-Gengou bacillus and obtained a positive reaction
doi:10.1001/archinte.1915.00080010071006 fatcat:uuxjzmjj6bfu7azgurlkfmfloy