REPORT OF A CASE OF FRACTURE OF THE BASE OF THE SKULL FOLLOWED BY MENINGITIS AND ORGANIC HEMIPLEGIA, ASSOCIATED WITH COMA AND CATALEPSY LASTING EIGHTEEN MONTHS

Arthur Conklin Brush
1902 Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease  
This patient was nineteen years of age, born in Scotland and resided there for eighteen years. He is an only child, his mother is living and in good health, and his father died during his infancy of typhoid fever. As far as can be ascer¬ tained there is no neurotic taint in his ancestry. Previous to Oct. 26, 1896, he had always enjoyed good health, and was a strong and vigorous young man of good mental ability and exemplary habits. On that date he was assaulted by three men, thrown violently
more » ... thrown violently backward to the pavement, and kicked about the body and limbs. During the next three days he re¬ mained in a week condition, crying and trembling, and grad¬ ually growing more dazed and stupid, while during the same period blood escaped from the mouth; and at the end of that period he passed into the condition in which he was when I first saw him in consultation with Dr. W. L. Rickard. I found the patient in bed. He had the color and development of a healthy and vigorous young man. There was a swollen and tender spot over the occiput. The head was turned to the left, but free voluntary movements occurred at times. The eyeballs were directed forward and moved freely. The right forearm was flexed across the chest with the fingers of the right hand extended and the thumb flexed across the palm. The right lower limb was straight and the left flexed so that the foot rested on the opposite calf. Occasionally, and especially when he was disturbed, very violent move¬ ments would occur in the limbs of the left side; and at the same time he would shout, "They are strangling me, they are killing me, they are murdering mebut he did not give any evidence of being conscious of his surroundings. At times he would place his left hand to his head and contract his brows. There was a constant fine tremor of the arms, most marked on the left side. No voluntary movements occurred on the right side, and the limbs and chest of that side were rendered immovable by tonic spasm of the muscles. All the
doi:10.1097/00005053-190205000-00006 fatcat:3hrmcus4nbc35mzyg5bkigkbay