Peer Review #3 of "Isotopic biomonitoring of anthropic carbon emissions in a megalopolis (v0.1)" [peer_review]

A Benitez
2020 unpublished
Atmospheric pollution has become a serious threat for human health and the environment. However, the deployment, operation, and maintenance of monitoring networks can represent a high cost for local governments. In certain locations, the use of naturally occurring plants for monitoring pollution can be a useful supplement of existing monitoring networks, and even provide information when other types of monitoring are lacking. In this work, we i) determined the tissue carbon content and the δ 13
more » ... ontent and the δ 13 C values for the epiphytic CAM bromeliad Tillandsia recurvata and the relationship of both parameters with the existing CO concentrations in the Valley of Mexico basin, and ii) mapped the spatial distribution of such elemental and isotopic composition for this plant within the basin, in order to assess its potential as an atmospheric biomonitor of carbon monoxide, a pollutant with important repercussions on public health. The CO concentrations in the basin ranged from 0.41 ppm at rural locations to 0.81 ppm at urban sites. The carbon content of T. recurvata which averaged 42.9 ± 0.34% (dry weight), was not influenced by the surrounding CO concentration. In contrast, the δ 13 C depended on the sites where the plants were collected. For example, the values were -13.21‰ in rural areas and as low as -17.47‰ in an urban site. Indeed, the isotopic values had a positive linear relationship with the atmospheric CO concentrations. Given the close relationship observed between the isotopic composition of T. recurvata with the CO concentrations in the Valley of Mexico, the δ 13 C values can be useful for the detection of atmospheric carbonaceous emissions. PeerJ reviewing PDF | Abstract 19 Atmospheric pollution has become a serious threat for human health and the environment. However, the 20 deployment, operation, and maintenance of monitoring networks can represent a high cost for local 21 governments. In certain locations, the use of naturally occurring plants for monitoring pollution can be a 22 useful supplement of existing monitoring networks, and even provide information when other types of 23 monitoring are lacking. In this work, we i) determined the tissue carbon content and the δ 13 C values for 24 the epiphytic CAM bromeliad Tillandsia recurvata and the relationship of both parameters with the 25 existing CO concentrations in the Valley of Mexico basin, and ii) mapped the spatial distribution of such 26 elemental and isotopic composition for this plant within the basin, in order to assess its potential as an 27 atmospheric biomonitor of carbon monoxide, a pollutant with important repercussions on public health. 28 The CO concentrations in the basin ranged from 0.41 ppm at rural locations to 0.81 ppm at urban sites. 29 The carbon content of T. recurvata which averaged 42.9 ± 0.34% (dry weight), was not influenced by the 30 surrounding CO concentration. In contrast, the δ 13 C depended on the sites where the plants were 31 collected. For example, the values were -13.21‰ in rural areas and as low as -17.47‰ in an urban site. 32 Indeed, the isotopic values had a positive linear relationship with the atmospheric CO concentrations. 33 Given the close relationship observed between the isotopic composition of T. recurvata with the CO 34 concentrations in the Valley of Mexico, the δ 13 C values can be useful for the detection of atmospheric 35 carbonaceous emissions. 36 PeerJ reviewing PDF |
doi:10.7287/peerj.9283v0.1/reviews/3 fatcat:werbaeqmgzhf5hjgcybftkhlaa