Triglyceride glucose index for predicting cardiovascular outcomes after percutaneous coronary intervention in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and acute coronary syndrome

Xiaoteng Ma, Lisha Dong, Qiaoyu Shao, Yujing Cheng, Sai Lv, Yan Sun, Hua Shen, Zhijian Wang, Yujie Zhou, Xiaoli Liu
2020 Cardiovascular Diabetology  
The triglyceride glucose (TyG) index, a simple surrogate estimate of insulin resistance, has been demonstrated to predict cardiovascular (CV) disease morbidity and mortality in the general population and many patient cohorts. However, to our knowledge, the prognostic usefulness of the TyG index after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and acute coronary syndrome (ACS) has not been determined. This study aimed to evaluate the association of
more » ... he TyG index with adverse CV outcomes in patients with T2DM and ACS who underwent PCI. The TyG index was calculated using the formula ln[fasting triglycerides (mg/dL) × fasting glucose (mg/dL)/2]. The primary endpoint was the composite of all-cause mortality, non-fatal stroke, non-fatal myocardial infarction, or unplanned repeat revascularization. The association between the TyG index and adverse CV outcomes was assessed by Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. In total, 776 patients with T2DM and ACS who underwent PCI (mean age, 61 ± 10 years; men, 72.2%) were included in the final analysis. Over a median follow-up of 30 months, 188 patients (24.2%) had at least 1 primary endpoint event. The follow-up incidence of the primary endpoint rose with increasing TyG index tertiles. The multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analysis adjusted for multiple confounders revealed a hazard ratio for the primary endpoint of 2.17 (95% CI 1.45-3.24; P for trend = 0.001) when the highest and lowest TyG index tertiles were compared. The TyG index was significantly and positively associated with adverse CV outcomes, suggesting that the TyG index may be a valuable predictor of adverse CV outcomes after PCI in patients with T2DM and ACS.
doi:10.1186/s12933-020-01006-7 pmid:32156279 fatcat:2qiki4osrfeqplo3pvvf3ne2ry