THE OPTIMUM STRUCTURE OF BREEDING FLOCKS. I. RATE OF GENETIC IMPROVEMENT UNDER DIFFERENT BREEDING PLANS

Everett R Dempster, I Michael Lerner
1947 Genetics  
H E primary object of a breeder is to change the genetic composition of the population under his control so as to increase the proportion of more desirable genotypes in it a t the expense of the less desirable ones. His ability to further this end is based on his power to.determine which of the animals in his flock or herd are permitted to reproduce themselves, and to some extent in his regulation of the rate of reproduction of animals thus selected. The efficiency of the breeder's operations
more » ... eder's operations depends on three factors: I) the intensity of selection, 2) the accuracy of selection, and 3) the average interval between generations (DICKERSON and HAZEL 1944) . The effect of the first of these factors is fairly obvious, since the improvement realized under selection is inversely related to the fraction of the population which is permitted to reproduce itself. If all of the members of a popu-
doi:10.1093/genetics/32.6.555 fatcat:kfsmdy2uybaejnqwgbd34yrdbu