Analysis of the Prevalence of and Risk Factors for Tinnitus in a Young Population

Bumjung Park, Hyo Geun Choi, Hyo-Jeong Lee, Soo-Youn An, Si Whan Kim, Joong Seob Lee, Sung Kwang Hong, Hyung-Jong Kim
2014 Otology and Neurotology  
Pape J et al. (2014) Playing and listening to tailor-made notched music: cortical plasticity induced by unimodal and multimodal training in tinnitus patients. Neural Plast. The authors replicated their findings that listening to tailor-made notched music induces plastic changes in the auditory cortex which counteracts the tinnitus. Furthermore, they demonstrated the importance of an unisensory training where the participant attends the auditory stream only. Farinetti A et al. (2014) Cochlear
more » ... (2014) Cochlear implant complications in 403 patients: Comparative study of adults and children and review of the literature. A large number of 403 CI surgeries was assessed and analysed with respect to post-surgery complications. Overall, the complication rate was 19.9% (5% major, 14.0% minor) with a reduced complication rate for children. Park B et al. (2014) Analysis of the Prevalence of and Risk Factors for Tinnitus in a Young Population. Otol Neurotol. 2014 Jun 9. [Epub ahead of print] In a large Korean sample of over 3000 teenagers, the authors found a tinnitus prevalence of 17.7% -but only 0.3% of them report to be severely disturbed by it. Noise exposure, lack of sleep and female gender have been identified to be the major risk factors in this population. Jasper K et al. (2014) Internet-Based Guided Self-Help versus Group Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Chronic Tinnitus: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Psychother Psychosom. A face-to-face group cognitive behavioural therapy intervention for tinnitus (n=43) was compared with an internet-based cognitive behavioural therapy (n=41). Both groups showed significant improvements in the THI and Mini-TQ scores. There was no significant difference between the face-to-face and the internet-based intervention. Schneider DM et al. (2014) A synaptic and circuit basis for corollary discharge in the auditory cortex. Nature. 2014 Aug 27. doi: 10.1038/nature13724. [Epub ahead of print] In a mouse model, the authors demonstrated the suppression of excitatory neurons in the auditory cortex during movement. A subset of neurons in the secondary motor cortex directly inhibits the auditory cortex activity while the mouse is moving. This work might have an impact on tinnitus research and therapy. 2 (articles of authors who are collaborating with TRI are marked in blue) Playing and listening to tailor-made notched music: cortical plasticity induced by unimodal and multimodal training in tinnitus patients. Background. The generation and maintenance of tinnitus are assumed to be based on maladaptive functional cortical reorganization. Listening to modified music, which contains no energy in the range of the individual tinnitus frequency, can inhibit the corresponding neuronal activity in the auditory cortex. Music making has been shown to be a powerful stimulator for brain plasticity, inducing changes in multiple sensory systems. Using magnetoencephalographic (MEG) and behavioral measurements we evaluated the cortical plasticity effects of two months of (a) active listening to (unisensory) versus (b) learning to play (multisensory) tailor-made notched music in nonmusician tinnitus patients. Taking into account the fact that uni-and multisensory trainings induce different patterns of cortical plasticity we hypothesized that these two protocols will have different affects. Results. Only the active listening (unisensory) group showed significant reduction of tinnitus related activity of the middle temporal cortex and an increase in the activity of a tinnitus-coping related posterior parietal area. Conclusions. These findings indicate that active listening to tailor-made notched music induces greater neuroplastic changes in the maladaptively reorganized cortical network of tinnitus patients while additional integration of other sensory modalities during training reduces these neuroplastic effects. Free PMC Article. Cochlear implant complications in 403 patients: Comparative study of adults and children and review of the literature. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to assess the postoperative complications related to cochlear implants and to discuss the differences observed between adult and paediatric populations. Cochlear implant complications were defined as any pathological events observed during the postoperative period, whether or not they were directly related to the surgical technique. We therefore recorded all complications, in the broad sense of the term, ranging from acute otitis media to cochlear explantation. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective analysis of cochlear implant patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: All surgical procedures (unilateral or bilateral cochlear implantation, revision surgery) performed in our institution between March 1993 and January 2013 were reviewed. This population comprised 168 adults (median age at the time of implantation: 51.9years), and 235 children (median age at the time of implantation: 4.5years). All postoperative complications were classified as either major (requiring surgical revision or hospital management) or minor (requiring conservative management). RESULTS: The global complication rate was 19.9% (80/403 cases), comprising 5% of major complications (20 cases) and 14.9% of minor complications (60 cases). This complication rate was significantly higher in the adult population (P=0.004). CONCLUSION: Cochlear implantation is a safe hearing rehabilitation surgical technique associated with a low complication rate. However, surgeons must be familiar with these complications in order to ensure optimal prevention. Minor complications were mainly infectious in children (acute otitis media) and cochleovestibular in adults (tinnitus and back to Highlights 3 vertigo). Major complications were mostly reimplantation following revision surgery or device failure. Only the minor complication rate was significantly higher in the adult population.
doi:10.1097/mao.0000000000000472 pmid:24914798 fatcat:ivtivakxsbb4na5pe56uvgftz4