THE SYMPTOMATOLOGY OF LESIONS OF THE LENTICULAR ZONE WITH SOME DISCUSSION OF THE PATHOLOGY OF APHASIA

Charles K. Mills, William G. Spiller
1907 Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease  
In the discussion of the effects of lesions of the lenticular zone and the zone of Wernicke* in the production of aphasia, the im¬ portance of each portion of these zones must be carefully consid¬ ered. It is only in this way that we can arrive at reliable conclu¬ sions on the mooted questions of the localization of the represen¬ tation of the different elements of cerebral speech. The first and second temporal convolutions necessarily hold a prominent place in this discussion. It has been
more » ... n. It has been usually held that the higher auditory area, the so-called center for word hearing, is situated in the posterior portion of the left first temporal convolution, or of the first and second temporal convolutions, the focus of repre¬ sentation being about opposite the posterior upward turning of the horizontal branch of the Sylvian fissure. As a rule more stress has been laid upon lesions of the cortex than of the sub¬ cortex in the causation of word deafness, although of course the pure word deafness of Lic'htheim and Dejerine has been attrib-In the two cases, the histories of which have just been given, *It might be well to give here Marie's definition of this zone. Accord¬ ing to him it consists of the supramarginal and angular gyri and the feet of the first two temporal convolutions. Its limitations cannot be accurately determined, and it is impossible to say whether the symptoms accompany¬ ing a lesion of this zone are caused by the alteration of the cortex or the subjacent white matter; Marie inclines toward the importance of the whit# matter.
doi:10.1097/00005053-190710000-00002 fatcat:hkxae7fp5rgipozzni7srxcmsu