Postactivation potentiation in a human muscle: effect on the load-velocity relation of tetanic and voluntary shortening contractions

Stéphane Baudry, Jacques Duchateau
2007 Journal of applied physiology  
Baudry S, Duchateau J. Postactivation potentiation in a human muscle: effect on the load-velocity relation of tetanic and voluntary shortening contractions. cently it was demonstrated that postactivation potentiation (PAP), which refers to the enhancement of the muscle twitch torque as a result of a prior conditioning contraction, increased the maximal rate of torque development of tetanic and voluntary isometric contractions (3). In this study, we investigated the effects of PAP and its decay
more » ... ver time on the load-velocity relation. To that purpose, angular velocity of thumb adduction in response to a single electrical stimulus (twitch), a high-frequency train of 15 pulses at 250 Hz (HFT 250), and during ballistic voluntary shortening contractions, performed against loads ranging from 10 to 50% of the maximum torque, were recorded before and after a conditioning 6-s maximal voluntary contraction (MVC). The results showed an increase of the peak angular velocity for the different loads tested after the conditioning MVC (P Ͻ 0.001), but the effect was greatest for the twitch (ϳ182%) compared with the HFT 250 or voluntary contractions (ϳ14% for both contraction types). The maximal potentiation occurred immediately following the conditioning MVC for the twitch, whereas it was reached 1 min later for the tetanic and ballistic voluntary contractions. At that time, the loadvelocity relation was significantly shifted upward, and the maximal power of the muscle was increased (ϳ13%; P Ͻ 0.001). Furthermore, the results also indicated that the effect of PAP on shortening contractions was not related to the modality of muscle activation. In conclusion, the findings suggest a functional significance of PAP in human movements by improving muscle performance of voluntary dynamic contractions. skeletal muscle; contractile properties; muscle power; electrical stimulation Address for reprint requests and other correspondence: J. Duchateau,
doi:10.1152/japplphysiol.00403.2007 pmid:17641222 fatcat:bhhmopnckfhc7lzt3fb32a6jfq