Pancreatic stone protein predicts postoperative infection in cardiac surgery patients irrespective of cardiopulmonary bypass or surgical technique

Holger J Klein, Adam Csordas, Volkmar Falk, Ksenija Slankamenac, Alain Rudiger, Felix Schönrath, Hector Rodriguez Cetina Biefer, Christoph T Starck, Rolf Graf
2015
INTRODUCTION: We investigated the role of pancreatic stone protein (PSP) in predicting the occurrence of infection in the postoperative course of cardiac surgery patients. Several biomarkers indicating the presence of inflammation and infection are available in the clinical routine; yet, their utility in the postoperative course of patients following cardiac surgery remains uncertain. Moreover, cardiopulmonary bypass, also referred to as "on-pump surgery", increases the susceptibility to an
more » ... ptibility to an exaggerated inflammatory state. However, the impact of such extracorporeal circulation on circulating PSP levels remains poorly understood. METHODS: In a prospective cohort of unselected patients undergoing cardiac surgery, we set out to elucidate the diagnostic accuracy of serum PSP levels as opposed to canonical biomarkers (CRP, WBC) of inflammation to discriminate between the presence of infection and surgical trauma,. In addition, we investigated whether the biomarkers were influenced by the surgical technique employed, i.e. on-pump vs. off-pump and minimally invasive surgery vs. sternotomy. Levels of circulating PSP and routine inflammatory biomarkers (CRP, WBC) were measured in samples taken from 120 patients at baseline as well as at postoperative day 1-3. RESULTS: Univariate analysis showed that among the biomarkers investigated, only PSP levels had discriminatory power to differentiate infection from surgical trauma in the postoperative course of the entire cohort of patients following cardiac surgery. With regard to cardiac surgical interventions, there was no significant association between the absence or presence of extracorporeal circulation and PSP levels. However, there was a significant difference in the slope of the rise of postoperative PSP between minimally invasive surgery as opposed to patients subjected to sternotomy. CONCLUSION: In an unselected population of cardiac surgery patients, post-operative serum PSP levels were significantly associated with the presence of infection in both the on-pump and off-pump setting. Of note, the surgical technique employed (sternotomy vs. minimally invasive approach) had a significant impact on postoperative PSP levels. (2015). Pancreatic stone protein predicts postoperative infection in cardiac surgery patients irrespective of cardiopulmonary bypass or surgical technique. PLoS ONE, 10(3):e0120276. Abstract Results Univariate analysis showed that among the biomarkers investigated, only PSP levels had discriminatory power to differentiate infection from surgical trauma in the postoperative PLOS ONE | course of the entire cohort of patients following cardiac surgery. With regard to cardiac surgical interventions, there was no significant association between the absence or presence of extracorporeal circulation and PSP levels. However, there was a significant difference in the slope of the rise of postoperative PSP between minimally invasive surgery as opposed to patients subjected to sternotomy. Conclusion In an unselected population of cardiac surgery patients, post-operative serum PSP levels were significantly associated with the presence of infection in both the on-pump and offpump setting. Of note, the surgical technique employed (sternotomy vs. minimally invasive approach) had a significant impact on postoperative PSP levels. Pancreatic Stone Protein in Cardiac Surgery Patients PLOS ONE | Fig 2. Time course of biomarkers (A-C) following cardiac surgery. All inflammatory markers investigated showed a statistically significant rise in the course of postoperative day 1-3 (p<0.05, determined by a linear mixed effects regression model).
doi:10.5167/uzh-115504 fatcat:6qdaaidsrzhnbc4mn2yzamc23q