Amnesia [editorial]

Joseph Hall
1887 Science  
Known as the Early Journal Content, this set of works include research articles, news, letters, and other writings published in more than 200 of the oldest leading academic journals. The works date from the mid--seventeenth to the early twentieth centuries. We encourage people to read and share the Early Journal Content openly and to tell others that this resource exists. People may post this content online or redistribute in any way for non--commercial purposes. Read more about Early Journal
more » ... out Early Journal Content at http://about.jstor.org/participate--jstor/individuals/early-journal--content. JSTOR is a digital library of academic journals, books, and primary source objects. JSTOR helps people discover, use, and build upon a wide range of content through a powerful research and teaching platform, and preserves this content for future generations. JSTOR is part of ITHAKA, a not--for--profit organization that also includes Ithaka S+R and Portico. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org. EVOL. X. No. 250 demand in England and Russia for low-grade teas, but the mer-EVOL. X. No. 250 demand in England and Russia for low-grade teas, but the mer-250 250 chants have lost no medium and fine quality teas, the rates for them being unprecedentedly low. {'This depreciation in their value in England is partly assignable to a falling-off in the Russian demand for fine tea; but the want of keeping properties in China leaf, probably owing to hasty and imperfect preparation, has also a good deal to do with it." Fine China teas have not been bought for Russia because of an increase in the import duty, and, in place of increasing the price to the retail purchaser, an inferior leaf has beer purchased." The German Academical Union, in its last general meeting at Berlin, laid down the following principles of reform for the German schools: (I) The children are in many ways overburdened by the present scholastic system; (2) There is not sufficient harmony between the school and the home life; (3) The training of the body is not attended to in proportion to that of the mind; (4) The exclusive privileges belonging at present to the classical schoolss as securing an entrance to the learned professions, ought to be extended to the modern schools; (5) There ought to be an easy access from the elementary schools to the middle and higher schools; (6) The FznSeatsscA?zle is the most pressirlg need of the present time. -The forty-third annual meeting of the Massachusetts Teachers' Association will be held in the Girls' High-School building, Boston, Friday and Saturday, Nov. zS ancl 26. The following programme is published:-Norr. 25, ' English in Secondary Schoolss' by William R. Shipman, D.D., professoXr of rhetoric, Tufts College, discussion to be opened by W. C. Collar, head master of Roxbury The attention of sciettzjf c xten is caZZed to the advantages of the correspondeozse coSS^Znsof S;cIENczors5Sczg$rozUtSy on record brzefSSreSigzinary tzoZices of tAIeir in7vestigstions. TwgszZy copies of the on?,6snber covtaining his comm?,6ticatiosz uziS be.farn2shedgree to any correspondKerzt on ref vest. TEe editor ql)iU be ^Zad to fizgbSish aty q?series cotsotant ql)ith the character of tAeyo«6-rnaZ. Correskondents ewre reested to be as brief as possibSe. TAe uJriter's nagze is ir aZZ cases re?wiredf as}roof of good fiaith. Amnesia. IT see1ns to me that cases of amnesia like those mentioned in chants have lost no medium and fine quality teas, the rates for them being unprecedentedly low. {'This depreciation in their value in England is partly assignable to a falling-off in the Russian demand for fine tea; but the want of keeping properties in China leaf, probably owing to hasty and imperfect preparation, has also a good deal to do with it." Fine China teas have not been bought for Russia because of an increase in the import duty, and, in place of increasing the price to the retail purchaser, an inferior leaf has beer purchased." The German Academical Union, in its last general meeting at Berlin, laid down the following principles of reform for the German schools: (I) The children are in many ways overburdened by the present scholastic system; (2) There is not sufficient harmony between the school and the home life; (3) The training of the body is not attended to in proportion to that of the mind; (4) The exclusive privileges belonging at present to the classical schoolss as securing an entrance to the learned professions, ought to be extended to the modern schools; (5) There ought to be an easy access from the elementary schools to the middle and higher schools; (6) The FznSeatsscA?zle is the most pressirlg need of the present time. -The forty-third annual meeting of the Massachusetts Teachers' Association will be held in the Girls' High-School building, Boston, Friday and Saturday, Nov. zS ancl 26. The following programme is published:-Norr. 25, ' English in Secondary Schoolss' by William R. Shipman, D.D., professoXr of rhetoric, Tufts College, discussion to be opened by W. C. Collar, head master of Roxbury
fatcat:6g562f4ep5dn7bk6gkftd2xpim