Venous cuff pressures from 30 mmHg to diastolic pressure are recommended to measure arterial inflow by plethysmography

Jan T. Groothuis, Linda van Vliet, Miriam Kooijman, Maria T. E. Hopman
2003 Journal of applied physiology  
Venous cuff pressures from 30 mmHg to diastolic pressure are recommended to measure arterial inflow by plethysmography. J Appl Physiol 95: 342-347, 2003. First published April 4, 2003 10.1152/ japplphysiol.00022.2003.-Venous occlusion strain gauge plethysmography (VOP) is based on the assumption that the veins are occluded and arterial inflow is undisturbed by the venous cuff pressure. Literature is not clear concerning the pressure that should be used. The purpose of this study was to
more » ... udy was to determine the optimal venous occlusion pressure at which the highest arterial inflow is achieved in the forearm, calf, and leg by using VOP. We hypothesized that, for each limb segment, an optimal (range of) venous cuff pressure can be determined. Arterial inflow in each limb segment was measured in nine healthy individuals by VOP by using pressures ranging from 10 mmHg up to diastolic blood pressure. Arterial inflows were similar at cuff pressures between 30 and 60 mmHg for the forearm, leg, and calf. Arterial inflow in the forearm was significantly lower at 10 mmHg compared with the other cuff pressures. In addition, arterial inflows at 20 mmHg tended to be lower in each limb segment than flow at higher cuff pressures. In conclusion, no single optimum venous cuff pressure, at which a highest arterial inflow is achieved, exists, but rather a range of optimum cuff pressures leading to a similar arterial inflow. Venous cuff pressures ranging from 30 mmHg up to diastolic blood pressure are recommended to measure arterial inflow by VOP. arterial blood flow; forearm; upper leg; calf; perfusion pressure
doi:10.1152/japplphysiol.00022.2003 pmid:12679358 fatcat:wgm345kux5cmfcsvsl3ynefziy