Ionospheric Research

L. A. Manning
1966 Science  
these and observations of sudden magnetic storm commencements, geomagnetic bays, and solar flare effects, it should be possible to study the distribution of conductivity within the earth and thereby "to say something about the temperature distribution and the phase transition supposed at a depth of a few hundred kilometers." However, Rikitake "is of the opinion that in view of the resolving power of existing analyses of transient geomagnetic variations, we can only say that the increase in the
more » ... he increase in the conductivity at a depth of several hundred kilometers is very steep." The last three chapters deal with the effect of the ocean on geomagnetic variations, the advantages and limitations of the "magneto-telluric" method, and local anomalies of geomagnetic variation that indicate lateral inhomogeneities of electrical conductivity within the earth's crust and mantle. The book can be highly recommended as a clearly presented, comprehensively documented, and well-illustrated summary of the results of the current research in geomagnetism and electromagnetism relating to the interior of the earth. Volume 1 in the Mathematical Association of America's "Studies in Mathematics" series, Studies in Modern Analysis, was published in 1962. Volume 3, Studies in Real and Complex Analysis (Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, N.J., 1965. 221 pp., $4), edited by I. I. Hirschman, Jr., might be considered a continuation of volume 1, for it makes contact with the subject matter of that book at several points. The second volume, Studies in Modern Algebra, was concerned with quite different mathematical material. In the introduction to volume 1, it was stated that the purpose of the series is "to bring to the general mathematical community expository articles at the collegiate and graduate level on recent developments in mathematics and the teaching of mathematics" in order to these and observations of sudden magnetic storm commencements, geomagnetic bays, and solar flare effects, it should be possible to study the distribution of conductivity within the earth and thereby "to say something about the temperature distribution and the phase transition supposed at a depth of a few hundred kilometers." However, Rikitake "is of the opinion that in view of the resolving power of existing analyses of transient geomagnetic variations, we can only say that the increase in the conductivity at a depth of several hundred kilometers is very steep." The last three chapters deal with the effect of the ocean on geomagnetic variations, the advantages and limitations of the "magneto-telluric" method, and local anomalies of geomagnetic variation that indicate lateral inhomogeneities of electrical conductivity within the earth's crust and mantle. The book can be highly recommended as a clearly presented, comprehensively documented, and well-illustrated summary of the results of the current research in geomagnetism and electromagnetism relating to the interior of the earth. Volume 1 in the Mathematical Association of America's "Studies in Mathematics" series, Studies in Modern Analysis, was published in 1962. Volume 3, Studies in Real and Complex Analysis (Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, N.J., 1965. 221 pp., $4), edited by I. I. Hirschman, Jr., might be considered a continuation of volume 1, for it makes contact with the subject matter of that book at several points. The second volume, Studies in Modern Algebra, was concerned with quite different mathematical material. In the introduction to volume 1, it was stated that the purpose of the series is "to bring to the general mathematical community expository articles at the collegiate and graduate level on recent developments in mathematics and the teaching of mathematics" in order to
doi:10.1126/science.152.3724.952-a pmid:17819799 fatcat:535eq3ghiveq5mcpe3aqqmgc7m