How Do Sex Ratios Affect Marriage and Labor Markets? Evidence from America's Second Generation

J. Angrist
2002 Quarterly Journal of Economics  
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doi:10.1162/003355302760193940 fatcat:ciwap7zzznh2hpilxlkwm3xyzi