Clinical, Epidemiological and Bacteriological Profile of Culture Positive Urinary Tract Infections in Febrile Children – A Cross Sectional Study
English

Bhavani Shankar Rokkam, Chowdary Babu Menni, Ramu Pedada, Deepak Kumar Alikana
2021 Journal of Evidence Based Medicine and Healthcare  
BACKGROUND Urinary tract infections (UTI) constitute a common cause of morbidity in infants and children. When associated with abnormalities of urinary tract, they may lead to long-term complications including renal scarring, loss of function and hypertension. Most urinary tract infections remain undiagnosed if investigations are not routinely performed to detect them. Prompt detection and treatment of urinary tract infections and any complicating factors are important. The objective of the
more » ... bjective of the study is to know the clinical, epidemiological and bacteriological profile (i.e. clinical signs and symptoms, age, sex, family history, associated urinary tract abnormalities, & causative organisms) of urinary tract infections in febrile children with culture positive urinary tract infection. METHODS This descriptive, cross sectional observational study was conducted at outpatient clinics of our "child health clinics" between May 2016 and April 2017 (one year). All children aged 0 to 12 years with culture positive urinary tract infections were included in this study to evaluate the clinical, epidemiological and bacteriological profile. RESULTS A total of 69 children with culture positive urinary tract infections were included in this study. Out of 69 children included in this study, 36 (52.2 %) were females and 33 (47.8 %) were males. Overall female preponderance was seen and the M: F ratio was 0.9:1. But during first year of life in our study group we had more boys (10, 14.49 %) affected with urinary tract infection than girls. 49.3 % of urinary tract infections in the present study belonged to lower socio-economic status. Most common organism causing urinary tract infection in our group was E. coli (56.5 %). Fever (100 %), anorexia or refusal of feeds (52.2 %), dysuria (46.4 %), vomiting (46.4 %) and abdominal pain (39.1 %) were the predominant clinical manifestations observed in our study. CONCLUSIONS Urinary tract infection is a common medical problem in children and it should be considered as a potential cause of fever in children. As febrile children with urinary tract infection usually present with non-specific signs and symptoms, urine culture should be considered as a part of diagnostic evaluation. KEYWORDS Urinary Tract Infections (UTI), Febrile Children, Bacteriological Profile, Urine Culture
doi:10.18410/jebmh/2021/102 fatcat:6i7wn6ghv5fqvnttwn4scdtjjq