Book Review A Text-Book of the Practice of Medicine . For Students and Practitioners. By Hobart Amory Hare, B.SC, M.D. Third edition, revised and enlarged. Imperial octavo, 969 pages with 142 engravings and 16 plates in colors and monochrome. Philadelphia and New York: Lea and Febiger. 1915

1915 Boston Medical and Surgical Journal  
of Diseases of Children in the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Baltimore. Fourth edition. Illustrated, pp. 552. W. B. Saunders Company. 1914. This fourth edition of a standard manual of pediatrics contains numerous minor changes from the original, with the addition of an article on pellagra in children, a new chapter on drug eruptions, a full account of the Binet-Simon test for the mentality of children and description of the use of the Soy bean and various newer methods in infant feeding.
more » ... in infant feeding. The book is well illustrated with 176 text figures and should continue its valuable service as a text-book for medical students and others. " Pressers, " and concludes with a general summary and recommendations. The information which the book contains is carefully and systematically arranged and clearly stated. As a record of conditions to be encountered in social and public health service, it should prove a valuable addition to the already existing literature on this subject of industrial hygiene. The volume contains a number of photographs taken of typical conditions in factories as the author found them, and a large number of tables and charts. A Text-Book of the Practice of Medicine. For Students and Practitioners. By Hobart Amory Hare, B.SC, M.D. Third edition, revised and enlarged. Imperial octavo, 969 pages with 142 engravings and 16 plates in colors and monochrome. Philadelphia and New York: Lea and Febiger. 1915. Dr. Hare has made very extensive changes in his third edition and has given us essentially a new book based on the general outlines of his previous edition. He has adhered to his original purpose of making the book reflect his personal views wherever possible. For example-in his discussion of the treatment of typhoid fever he outlines his own management of the diet and makes no reference whatsoever to the use of the liberal diet originally advocated by Shattuck, and carried to the extent of forced feeding by Coleman. References to the literature are not infrequent, but do not comprise a feature of any importance in the book. On the whole, like its predecessors, this edition is a sound exposition of the practice of medicine, based chiefly on the writer's wide experience in hospital and private practice. A very complete index is a valuable feature.
doi:10.1056/nejm191507291730519 fatcat:rm7i6a5txbhajle7y4tmxilqou