Dialogs by Jerry Szymanski regarding the Yucca Mountain controversy from December, 1990 to March, 1991: Volume 2. Special report number 9, Contract number 92/94.0004 [report]

1993 unpublished
~nclosed please find a copy of the presentatiom I have prepared for the forthcaming National Sciences Academy field trip. questions regarding the enclosed material, please do not hesitate to contact Should you have any me at (702) 794-7941 or PTS 544-7941. Enclosure : Presentation Package cc w/encl : Downhole temperatuse profiles. Borehole UE-25a3. North-westem margin of the Skull Mountain hydraulic "source" region. Downhole temperature profiles. Boreholes J-1 1. TWF, and TW3. Skull Mountain
more » ... . Skull Mountain hydraulic "source" region. Downhole temperature profiles. Pahute Mesa hydraulic "sink" and "source" regions. Groundwater chemistry. Hydraulic "sink" and dilated regions. The Nevada Test Site hydrosphere. Groundwater chemistry. Hydraulic "source" regions. The Nevada Test Site hydrosphere. Expected relative isotopic expressions of the contemporary hydraulic "source" regions. The Nevada Test Site hydrosphere. Self-organization. The Nevada Test Site hydrosphen:dissolved uranium data. 234U/13aU ratio. The Nevada Test Site hydrosphere. U content. The Nevada Test Site hydrosphere. Isotopic character of dissolved uranium. Water samples from the hydraulic "source" and "sink" regions. 2uUPT.J ratio vs U-content field. Nevada Test Site subsurface fluids. 234UPuU vs U-content field. Hydraulic "sink" and dilated regions. The Nevada Test Site hydrosphere. 2wU/1W vs U-content field. Hydraulic "source" regions. The Nevada Test Site hydrosphere. Self-organization. The Nevada Test Site hydrospheredissolved strontium data. Comparison of the 87Srf6Sr ratios. m e Nevada Test Site "source" and "sink" regions. Conceptual understanding of spatial disiribution of the strontium and uranium isotopic ratios. The contemporary Nevada Test Site hydrosphere. 6 Temperature vs isotopic characters of dissolved uranium and strontium. Pahranagat Valley, Nevada. Self-organization. The Nevada Test Siic hydrospheredissolved carbon data. Calcite saturation index. Water samples from the Nevada Test Site hydraulic "sink" and "source" regions, 6°C vs PMC field. Water samples from the Nevada Tcst Site hydrosphere. Isotopic character of the dissolved carbon. Water samples from the Paleozoic cahonate based hydraulic "sink" and "source" regions. Isotopic character of ~e dissolved carbon. Walcr samples from h e alluviumtuff pile hydraulic "source" and "sink" regions. Contents p. t 0 A reliable interpretations of the Yucca Mountain PillCO-gColhC~al, based on h e observed dsi8O/dz gradient from simplcs of h e locd cakite-silica deposits, constitutes an important aspect of resolving the @lemma that surrounds the origin of these deposits. 0 A reliable demonstration that, in the Yucca Mountain vadose zone, the geolhcmrrl gradients undergo temporal fluctuations, with amplitudes say A d T b -10 -lS°Celsius per Ikm of depth, would constitute a fairly definitive dcrnonstration that: i) episodically, the Yucca Mountain vadose zone was k i n g inundated with warm fluids from below the water table; and ii) all of the Yucca Mountain calcite-silica deposits we% formed via the per ascensum process. A Kliable inleqmtation of the paleo-geothermal gradient is difficult to perform. This is so because such an interprctation requires two assumptions. These assumptions are: i) the oxygen -18 contents of the parenl fluids, for spatially and temporally diffennl samples, were eilher the Same of the 8'0 variability is both known and fixed in the spatio-temporal sense; and ii) the non-equilibrium isotopic fractionation effects are either absent or, telative to the equilibrium fractionation curve, maintain a know relationship. It is not possible to exactly specify the oxygen -18 content of chc parent fluids for the Yucca Mountain calcite-silica deposits. This is so because: i) the contemporary Yucca Mountain subsurface fluids exhibit the 6"O spatial variability of -1.5 per milsMowthis variability is known based on bulk fluid samples pumped out of large borehole segments, sampling "smoothing" may be involved, and the actual 8 ' 0 spatial variability may be larger, say AS" -3 per milam; and ii) for the time-spins represented by the Yucca Mountain calcite-silica deposits, the locally known value for the 6"O temporal variability ranges from 2.7 to about 4 per milsMow . / 0 * o Inlerpretalions of the paleo-geolhermal gradients, based on #he observed dWO/dz gradientgeneral remarks.
doi:10.2172/201751 fatcat:qfqbva3opvefje4uuzxlb7jrqu