CASE OF CENTRAL RUPTURE OF THE PERINEUM, SCARLET FEVER, AND SEPTICÆMIA

J.H. Ashton
1889 The Lancet  
AT about 1.30 P.M. on April 26th I was sent for to attend Mrs. W——, age twenty-three, in her confinement. I found her a well-developed woman, with regular but not very strong pains. On examining her, the os uteri was about the size of a shilling, the head presenting, and in the first position. At 2.30 P.M. the os uteri was fully dilated, and the membranes ruptured. At 4.15 p. m. the perineum began to distend ; the pains were not very strong; the parts were moist, the pulse was quiet, and the
more » ... s quiet, and the head continued to advance gradually. A few minutes before the birth of the child, which occurred at 5.30 P.M.,
doi:10.1016/s0140-6736(02)29576-8 fatcat:phaaa3vyzvd5jhe547z7kh5bqa