The Relationship between Social Economic Levels and Anemia Events in Pregnant Women in Glugur Darat Health Center

Berliana Noviyanti, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Methodist Indonesia, Harry C Simanjuntak, Eka Samuel P Hutasoit, Hendrika A Silitonga, Endy Julianto, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Methodist Indonesia, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Methodist Indonesia, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Methodist Indonesia, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Methodist Indonesia
2019 Journal of Maternal and Child Health  
Anemia is a condition where the hemoglobin level in the blood was lower than normal. Anemia diagnosed when the hemoglobin level was <11 gr / dl in the first and third trimesters or <10.5 gr% in the second trimester in pregnant women. WHO stated in 2010 that 40% of the causes of maternal mortality in developing countries were associated with anemia in pregnancy. Based on the Riskesdas (Basic Health Research) in 2013, the prevalence of anemia in pregnant women in Indonesia was 37.1%. One of the
more » ... 37.1%. One of the factors that influenced the incidence of anemia in pregnant women was the socio-economic level. The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between socio-economic level and the incidence of anemia in pregnant women at the Glugur Darat Health Center. Subjects and Method: This was an analytical study with a cross sectional approach, conducted at Glugur Darat health center, Medan in 2018. Total 65 pregnant women were selected by consecutive sampling. The independent were the education level, job status, income level. The dependent variable was the incidence of anemia in pregnant women. Data obtained by a set of questionnaire. The data analysis was conducted using Chi Square test. Results: As many as 40 pregnant women (61.5%) had anemia and 25 (38.5%) who were not anemic. 34 people (85.0%) among pregnant women with anemia was in the non-risk group, and 22 people in the Multi-gravida group (55.0%), 16 (40.0%) people in the Primipara group, 27 people (67.5%) in Trimester gestational age III. As many as 28 people (70.0%) had secondary education. Based on occupational 31 people (77.5%) was not working, 19 people (47.5%) had medium income. Conclusion: There was no significant relationship between the level of education, occupational status, and income level with the incidence of anemia in pregnant women.
doi:10.26911/thejmch.2019.04.06.05 fatcat:gwfvfm57dvabzis224s42u3mhq