The Story of Old Kingston [review-book]

R. E. Dodge
1911 Bulletin of the American Geographical Society  
Known as the Early Journal Content, this set of works include research articles, news, letters, and other writings published in more than 200 of the oldest leading academic journals. The works date from the mid--seventeenth to the early twentieth centuries. We encourage people to read and share the Early Journal Content openly and to tell others that this resource exists. People may post this content online or redistribute in any way for non--commercial purposes. Read more about Early Journal
more » ... out Early Journal Content at http://about.jstor.org/participate--jstor/individuals/early-journal--content. JSTOR is a digital library of academic journals, books, and primary source objects. JSTOR helps people discover, use, and build upon a wide range of content through a powerful research and teaching platform, and preserves this content for future generations. JSTOR is part of ITHAKA, a not--for--profit organization that also includes Ithaka S+R and Portico. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org. Geographical Literature and Maps Geographical Literature and Maps lands in the valley. Reading between the lines the term "intervale" is seen to be equivalent to the flood plains and terraces along the Connecticut. The farm holdings were narrow rectangles extending from the river across the flood plain to the gravelly and sandy terraces upon which the buildings were usually located. The westward movement from New England avoided the Berkshire Plateau and entered New York from Pennsylvania and Lake Champlain. Passing up the Susquehanna Valley, settlers crossed the divide into the valley of the Genesee. The great movement in New York was along the Mohawk Valley and Ontario Plain to Buffalo. Three routes led to what was then the far west, the Braddock Road, the Ohio Valley and the Mohawk-Great Lakes, .the latter being by far the most important. The excellent population maps bring out at a glance the effect of this latter route which peopled with New Englanders the northern portions of Ohio, Indiana and Illinois. A large influx of Southerners have peopled the southern parts of these States. For a time there was a sharp contest between the county system of the South and the town meeting system of the New Englanders. Another interesting fact not specifically mentioned is that, in large part, the New England migrations were to regions which are like the home region, glaciated regions. Topographic resemblances between western New York and New England are repeatedly noted. A congregation of Granville, Mass., in the eastern part of the Berkshires, selected a similar location at Granville, Ohio, because the latter location had a "peculiar blending of hill and valley," to which they were accustomed. The vicinity of Beloit, Wis., on an outwash plain was selected for its level fields, water power, "unlimited gravel," and "New England look." Many other interesting geographical relations come out in reading this book, relations that need no great geographical training for their interpretation. The author is a student of Professor Turner, who with his students have done such good work in the geographical interpretation of United States history. It is a matter of some surprise, therefore, that in the problem of distribution so little emphasis is placed on important earth factors. To take a single example, the Erie Canal as a directing factor receives scarcely more than a paragraph. The book is a welcome contribution to historians, and no less welcome to geographers, because it assembles so many facts capable of geographic interpretation. The accumulation and assembling of material represents much labor, the style and arrangement make a most readable book. F. V. EMERSON. The Story of Old Kingston. By Agnes Maule Machar. 291 pp., illustrations and appendices. The Musson Book Co., Ltd., Toronto, T1Io. $T.5o. ;k. xxvi and 539 pp. illustrations, map, appendices and index. Macmillan & Co., Ltd., London, 1910. $4. 9g4 x 5.-The sub-title describes its real content. The author was adopted into the Blackfeet Indian tribe, secured their confidence, and is thus able to write authoritatively on their home life. The social life, religion, customs, traditions and history of these Indians is told in an interesting, unconventional manner. Such a book is especially useful, since the Blackfeets are rapidly disappearing, and the remnant is becoming civilized and forgetting the life and traditions of their fathers. F. V. EMERSON. Cuba. By Irene A. Wright. xiv and 512 pp., I map, 72 illustrations, index. The Macmillan Company, New York, 1910o. $2.50. In the opinion of the able journalist-editor who wrote this book and who has gathered her impressions of Cuba during ten years' interrupted residence on that island, Havana's population is "diseased, physically and morally, and also mentally." She asserts that such literature as is not printed in English is displayed on the public stalls; that Havana is rotten and rotting, and that those who note intelligently even the surface signs of existing conditions see all her undeniable beauties through thick miasma. In utter disgust she has repeatedly said "farewell forever" to the Queen of the Antilles; but, as she frankly admits, "each time, before I'd lost her well astern, I realized that I should return. Arrived in the North, the bustle of busier streets than hers annoyed me; brick and brownstone houses oppressed me with their gloom." Invariably she found herself longing to see the Cuban sky again, because all others looked faded in comparison-less blinding at noonday, less gaudy at sunset, and less deep, tender and marvellously blue at night. When she had planned to return to her native land, the palm trees of Havana's suburbs, "with feathery tops that rustle.in the wind have haunted my dreams until longing for the light, the color, the warmth of Havana was a pain not longer to be endured." We regard it as a fortunate circumstance that the tinted facades of the houses, the climate, the sky, and the tops of royal palms proved to be a mandate compelling such a well-trained observer and entertaining writer to complete her Cuban studies. Beside the chapters devoted to the capital, this volume contains descriptions of all those portions of the island, in the west and in the east, which are especially interesting to American readers. The Isle of Pines is, of course, not slighted, and there are chapters dealing with the "farce" of Cuban autonomy, as well as (somewhat casually) the riddle of Cuban ethnology. M. W. of the Argentine Meteorological Office. Pp. iii, pls. xliv. Buenos Aires, 1910. 4to. Argentina, with its great north and south extension; its massive western Cordilleran barrier, and its importance, because of its "temperate zone" location, as a future home for a vast and energetic population, has a peculiar inter-pressed in such excellent form that they are really literature. The volume should be particularly appealing to those who know and love the City of Kingston. R. E. DODGE. The Old North Trail; or Life, Legends and Religion of the Blackfeet Indians. By Walter McClinto;k. xxvi and 539 pp. illustrations, map, appendices and index. Macmillan & Co., Ltd., London, 1910. $4. 9g4 x 5.-The sub-title describes its real content. The author was adopted into the Blackfeet Indian tribe, secured their confidence, and is thus able to write authoritatively on their home life. The social life, religion, customs, traditions and history of these Indians is told in an interesting, unconventional manner. Such a book is especially useful, since the Blackfeets are rapidly disappearing, and the remnant is becoming civilized and forgetting the life and traditions of their fathers. F. V. EMERSON. Cuba. By Irene A. Wright. xiv and 512 pp., I map, 72 illustrations, index. of the Argentine Meteorological Office. Pp. iii, pls. xliv. Buenos Aires, 1910. 4to. Argentina, with its great north and south extension; its massive western Cordilleran barrier, and its importance, because of its "temperate zone" location, as a future home for a vast and energetic population, has a peculiar inter-
doi:10.2307/200644 fatcat:4dwzhdsrafcidkui7hlg7v57o4