Variations in reproductive and egg traits correlation estimates of two strains of Archachatina marginata snails (var. ovum and var. saturalis) and crosses

L. A. Ibom, B. Okon, A. Dauda, I. Patani
2020 Nigerian Journal of Animal Production  
A study was conducted to ariations in the reproductive traits and egg traitscorrelation estimates of the two strains of Archachatina marginata snails (var. ovum and var. saturalis) and their crosses. Ninety sexually mature A. marginata snails, forty-five each of the two strains (var. saturalis and var. ovum) were selected from a base population for the study. he live weight of the snails ranged from 256.43 – 566.25 g for both strains. Selection of the snails was based on active appearance and
more » ... ve appearance and lack of injury on the foot and on shells. The snails were randomly allotted into three mating models (treatments) of 30 each of var. saturalis, var. ovum and mixed strains (at 15 var. ovum : 15 var. saturalis). The models were designated as homozygous var. ovum main cross (AMO X AMO), homozygous var. saturalis main cross (AMS X AMS) and heterozygous (var. ovum x var. saturalis) cross (AMO X AMS). Each of the three models was replicated 15 times with two snails to a tub/cell for purposes of reproduction. Results from the study showed that the three mating models expressed significant (P<0.05) differences in the reproductive traits evaluated. Whereas some of the traits were not significantly (P>0.05) different between the AMO X AMO and AMO X AMS mating models, significant (P<0.05) differences existed between all the traits when the AMS AMS mating model was compared with the AMO X AMO and AMO X AMS mating models. The clutch size ranged from 7.00±0.35 (AMS X AMS) through 9.40±0.35 (AMO X AMS) to 9.90±0.35 (AMO X AMO), while the values for mean egg weight at lay ranged from 1.59±0.03 g (AMS X AMS) through 1.78±0.03 g (AMO X AMO) to 1.79±0.03 g (AMO X AMS). Percent hatchability value was highest in the AMO X AMO mating model (93.30 %), followed by the AMS X AMS mating model (91.10 %), while the AMO X AMS mating model recorded the lowest value (88.50 %). Percent survivability value was highest in the AMO X AMS mating model (84.00 %), followed by the AMO X AMO mating model (82.00 %), while the AMS X AMS mating model recorded the lowest value (80.00 %). The egg traits correlation estimates (rp) revealed that except for one pair of trait each in the mating models, all the other pairs of traits expressed positive and significant correlation coefficients/values. The AMO X AMS mating model recorded the highest correlation (rp) value (0.826) for the pair of ELH vs EWH, while the AMS X AMS mating model recorded the lowest correlation (rp) value (– 0.058) for the pair of ELH vs CSE. The percent egg shell colour distribution showed that the shell of eggs laid by the homozygous crosses (AMO X AMO and AMS X AMS) expressed two colours. The egg shell of eggs laid by AMO X AMO mating model expressed mikado yellowand maize yellow colours, while those laid by AMS X AMS mating model expressed Mikado yellow and amber colours. The shell of eggs laid by the heterozygous cross however expressed three colours; mikado yellow, maize yellow and amber. Based on the reproductive traits results, it could be recommended that the AMO X AMS mating model be adopted by farmers for optimum production and returns on investment.
doi:10.51791/njap.v45i1.358 fatcat:6twjkoubijhybke5zzqusaekai