Biotechnology as a low-level-of-coherence policy priority: effectual-targeting and the need for learning and experimentation capabilities

Dan Kaufmann, Oz Gore
2013 Technology Analysis & Strategic Management  
In recent years policymakers in various positions have been adopting a systems-approach to policy thinking. However, in contrast with the quasi-evolutionary way in which policy is thought of and conceptualized it seems that policy doing is still being guided by ?market-failure? justifications causing actual policies to remain narrow in their scope. In this paper we sidestep this analytical divide of Thinking/Doing by developing a co-evolutionary framework that utilizes Sarasvathy?s (2001) more
more » ... roductive analytical divide of Means/Ends. That is to say we focus on a process of co-evolution (Avnimelech & Teubal 2008) of a higher-order, one which takes place ?inside? the agent of policy herself, and involves changes in the ways ?means? and ?ends? are understood and acted upon. Conceptualizing policy problems in terms of Means/Ends contributes to current debates by rendering the difficulty that countries are facing in their attempts to prioritize biotechnology more intelligible and thus manageable. In recent years policymakers in various positions have been adopting a systemsapproach to policy thinking. However, in contrast with the quasi-evolutionary way in which policy is thought of and conceptualized it seems that policy doing is still being guided by 'market-failure' justifications causing actual policies to remain narrow in their scope. In this paper we sidestep this analytical divide of Thinking/Doing by developing a co-evolutionary framework that utilizes Sarasvathy's (2001) more productive analytical divide of Means/Ends. That is to say we focus on a process of co-evolution (Avnimelech & Teubal 2008) of a higher-order, one which takes place 'inside' the agent of policy herself, and involves changes in the ways 'means' and 'ends' are understood and acted upon. Conceptualizing policy problems in terms of Means/Ends contributes to current debates by rendering the difficulty that countries are facing in their attempts to prioritize biotechnology more intelligible and thus manageable.
doi:10.1080/09537325.2013.815712 fatcat:h4uzgg6qyncmjm5oknlr7gc2fi