Modelling the Interaction Levels in HCI Using an Intelligent Hybrid System with Interactive Agents: A Case Study of an Interactive Museum Exhibition Module in Mexico

Ricardo Rosales, Manuel Castañón-Puga, Felipe Lara-Rosano, Josue Flores-Parra, Richard Evans, Nora Osuna-Millan, Carelia Gaxiola-Pacheco
2018 Applied Sciences  
Technology has become a necessity in our everyday lives and essential for completing activities we typically take for granted; technologies can assist us by completing set tasks or achieving desired goals with optimal affect and in the most efficient way, thereby improving our interactive experiences. This paper presents research that explores the representation of user interaction levels using an intelligent hybrid system approach with agents. We evaluate interaction levels of Human-Computer
more » ... teraction (HCI) with the aim of enhancing user experiences. We consider the description of interaction levels using an intelligent hybrid system to provide a decision-making system to an agent that evaluates interaction levels when using interactive modules of a museum exhibition. The agents represent a high-level abstraction of the system, where communication takes place between the user, the exhibition and the environment. In this paper, we provide a means to measure the interaction levels and natural behaviour of users, based on museum user-exhibition interaction. We consider that, by analysing user interaction in a museum, we can help to design better ways to interact with exhibition modules according to the properties and behaviour of the users. An interaction-evaluator agent is proposed to achieve the most suitable representation of the interaction levels with the aim of improving user interactions to offer the most appropriate directions, services, content and information, thereby improving the quality of interaction experienced between the user-agent and exhibition-agent. Appl. Sci. 2018, 8, 446 2 of 21 technology? Is the interaction experienced better or worse? What are the interaction levels when using or not using technology and how does this change? Can we measure user interaction levels without metric variables, relying solely on body language, using linguistic variables? Which influencing factors increase or decrease our levels of interaction? What is the quality of the interaction? What is the interaction time? Which factors influence abandonment rates during interaction? This paper aims to address these questions by evaluating interaction levels in HCI and thereby improving user experiences. We consider the description of interaction levels using an intelligent hybrid approach to provide a decision-making system to an agent that self-evaluates interaction in interactive modules in a museum exhibition. The agents represent a high-level abstraction of the system, where communication takes place between the user, exhibition and the environment. In our research, we analyse the evaluation made by an on-site observer from a sample of 500 users that visited "El Trompo" Museo Interactivo Tijuana in Mexico to set-up a Fuzzy Inference System (FIS) [1] using 3 hybrid techniques: (1) Empirical FIS (EF) [2,3], (2) a Fuzzy C-Means method of Data Mining named Data Mined Type-1 (DMT1F) [4,5] and (3) Neuro-Fuzzy System (NFS) [6,7]. The different user action inputs were represented to classify interaction levels using a FIS to improve the provision of content with the purpose of increasing interaction levels experienced in the Museum. The involved actors included the user and the exhibition module, which were represented by agents as a high-level abstraction of the system. We expressed the native user by User-Agent, the exhibition module by Exhibition-Agent (GUI) and interaction evaluation system by Interaction Evaluator-Agent (Interaction Evaluator). related content. The user does not answer, only presence is confirmed. No interaction exists, only the action of being present. Key Features. Interactivity Null. No significant movements, only presence. Linguistic Value. Extremely Low Interaction (ELI). Level 1. The user hears or sees the content, but no meaningful action is perceived. The exhibition module only provides general content (welcome message or content and basic exhibition information). The user receives information, but does not control the interaction.
doi:10.3390/app8030446 fatcat:bz3jbiewoffujdnjjxr6dkzoom