SOME POINTS OF CONTACT BETWEEN NEUROLOGY AND ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY

JOEL E. GOLDTHWAIT
1909 Journal of the American Medical Association  
Presumably, from the manner in which the experiments have been conducted, the hemolysis brought about by the venom is due to the presence in it of an amboceptor; and the addition of serum to the mixture of venom and blood supplies the complement. How do the authors of the paper explain the disappearance of hemolytic power, since we know that amboceptors are sup¬ posed to be thermostabile? Dr. E. C. L. Miller, Detroit: Is there any especial explana¬ tion for the fact that venom acts in
more » ... m acts in proportion to the abso¬ lute quantity present and not in proportion to the dilution, as it forms, in this respect, an exception to the ordinary rule? Dr. Joseph McFarland, Philadelphia: When we found that it was necessary to change from a mixture containing only 2 c.c. to one containing 10 c.c, the question of the rela¬ tion of proportion to quantity arose, and we discovered that, as shown by a comparison of tables, the increase in quantity had no effect at all on the action of the venom. Then I sug¬
doi:10.1001/jama.1909.92550110001001f fatcat:c5mjgoq2gbaiva675m5m3fware