Blood Pressure in 6‐Year‐Old Children Born Extremely Preterm

Anna‐Karin Edstedt Bonamy, Lilly‐Ann Mohlkert, Jenny Hallberg, Petru Liuba, Vineta Fellman, Magnus Domellöf, Mikael Norman
2017 Journal of the American Heart Association : Cardiovascular and Cerebrovascular Disease  
Background--Advances in perinatal medicine have increased infant survival after very preterm birth. Although this progress is welcome, there is increasing concern that preterm birth is an emerging risk factor for hypertension at young age, with implications for the lifetime risk of cardiovascular disease. Methods and Results--We measured casual blood pressures (BPs) in a population-based cohort of 6-year-old survivors of extremely preterm birth (<27 gestational weeks; n=171) and in age-and
more » ... atched controls born at term (n=172). Measured BP did not differ, but sex, age-, and height-adjusted median z scores were 0.14 SD higher (P=0.02) for systolic BP and 0.10 SD higher (P=0.01) for diastolic BP in children born extremely preterm than in controls. Among children born extremely preterm, shorter gestation, higher body mass index, and higher heart rate at follow-up were all independently associated with higher BP at 6 years of age, whereas preeclampsia, smoking in pregnancy, neonatal morbidity, and perinatal corticosteroid therapy were not. In multivariate regression analyses, systolic BP decreased by 0.10 SD (P=0.08) and diastolic BP by 0.09 SD (P=0.02) for each weeklonger gestation. Conclusions--Six-year-old children born extremely preterm have normal but slightly higher BP than their peers born at term. Although this finding is reassuring for children born preterm and their families, follow-up at older age is warranted. ( J Am Heart
doi:10.1161/jaha.117.005858 pmid:28765277 pmcid:PMC5586434 fatcat:kq4qi7hzsfcuxdknkvzn7yhe3q