Consistency between Executable and Abstract Processes

A. Martens
2005 IEEE International Conference on e-Technology, e-Commerce and e-Service  
Process models play an all-important role in the development of cross-organizational business processes. On the one hand, the interaction between the participating companies often is specified globally, for example by means of multiple abstract process models -one for each partner. On the other hand, each partner defines its local process autonomously in terms of an executable process model. The important question is whether such an executable model is consistent to the predefined abstract
more » ... fined abstract model. This paper describes an approach to prove this property automatically. Emerging technologies and industrial standards in the field of Web services enable a much faster and easier cooperation of distributed partners. This paper is concerned with the application of Web services to distributed, cross-organizational business processes. A Web service [1] is a self-describing, self-contained modular application that can be described, published, located, and invoked over a network, e. g. the Internet. A Web service performs an encapsulated function and can be accessed via a standardized interface. In this paper, each local sub-process of each participating company is realized through one Web service. The composition of all Web services of all participating companies realizes the global business process. The Web service approach provides a stack of closely related technologies [3] to cover heterogeneity and distribution underneath a homogenous concept of components and composition. Among other things, the Business Process Execution Language for Web Services BPEL4WS [2] belongs to this stack. Due to this layered architecture, the presented method can be focussed on the Web service's process model in terms of BPEL4WS -without losing generality or practical relevance. The goal Process modeling is one of the most crucial tasks while developing or integrating enterprise applications. In practice, there are various levels of abstraction to Cross-organizational business process Cross-organizational business process Globally specified abstract model Globally specified abstract model Locally developed executable model Locally developed executable model Concrete behavior Concrete behavior Abstract behavior Abstract behavior Enterprise-local business process Enterprise-local business process simulates is consistent to participates Proof Demand Goal Scenario: Web Service based B2B integration Scenario: Web Service based B2B integration Cross-organizational business process Cross-organizational business process Globally specified abstract model Globally specified abstract model Locally developed executable model Locally developed executable model Concrete behavior Concrete behavior Abstract behavior Abstract behavior Enterprise-local business process Enterprise-local business process simulates is consistent to participates Proof Demand Goal Scenario: Web Service based B2B integration Scenario: Web Service based B2B integration Possible output: Referring to a given state, a possible output is the bag of output message that was produced while reaching one successor state. The function out yields the set of possible outputs. Communication step: A four-tuple (z, i, o, z ) is called communication step if z, z are states of a module, i is an input and o is an output, and (z + o) is a successor state of (z + i). S(M ) denotes the set of all communication steps of a module M . As shown in Figure 5 , the c-graph may contain cycles. That doesn't affect the presented analysis method as long as the graph is finite, which is the case for all
doi:10.1109/eee.2005.53 dblp:conf/eee/Martens05 fatcat:7yguwujtcvhi5lz3sidt6wvjiu