"Brain steatosis" in an obese mouse model during cycles of Famine and Feast the underestimated role of fat (WAT) in brain volume formation

Vincent van Ginneken, Evert de Vries, Elwin Verheij, Jan van der Greef
2017 Integrative Molecular Medicine  
Objective: Explain the observation of the the mechanism of an "overgrown brain" in a C57bl6 mouse model after exposure of juvenile individuals for 40 days to a High Fat diet based on bovine lard. Methods: 8-12 weeks old C57Bl6 mice were fed for 40 days a high-fat diet (+025% cholesterol 45% energy from bovine lard). With LC-MS techniques we measured Cholesteryl esters(ChE), lysophosphatidyl-cholines (LPC), phosphatidylcholine (PC), sphingomyelin (SPM) and Triacylglycerol's (TG) in brain tissue
more » ... G) in brain tissue after 40 days of exposure to a High Fat diet or nutritional intervention of two days starvation. Results: Major observation was that mainly unsaturated Very Long Chain Fatty Acids (TGs) of the C:50, C:52, C:54 and C56 TGs fraction were extremely accumulated in this HF-diet and were strongly correlated with the TGs with the HF-diet obese C57BL6 whole brain fraction (correlation coefficient r2=07.60 in comparison to control chow r2= 0.264). In addition, "brain steatosis" in the HF-diet group was also caused by a non-significant 135% increase of Docosahexaenoic Acid ([DHA] C22:6Ω3) in the HF-diet group in the brain. LPC and SPM were strongly significantly decreased in the starvation group (P<0.0001), followed by a strong decrease of PC and PE (P<0.007), followed by the DG fraction (P<0.017). In addition, ChE strongly significantly increased in the HF-diet group (P<0.001). Conclusions: From our observations we can conclude a juvenile rodent study showed in a by bovine lard induced obesity model an "overgrown brain" mainly by the accumulation of triacylglycerols (TGs). These observations of "brain steatosis" in a C57bl6 mouse model after a High Fat diet based on bovine lard in combination with the literature data of the anatomically found strict correlation between maternal Body Mass Index (BMI) and head circumference of new-born elevates our observations to the evolutionary research area of human encephalization. Ginneken V (2017) "Brain steatosis" in an obese mouse model during cycles of Famine and Feast the underestimated role of fat (WAT) in brain volume formation Volume 4(3): 2-6
doi:10.15761/imm.1000283 fatcat:ztf26uxyindsjctcckialyy7va