A Psychophysiological Assessment of the Efficacy of Event-Related Potentials and Electroencephalogram for Adaptive Task Allocation [unknown]

1998
Potentials (ERPs) for making task allocations decisions. Thirty-six participants were randomly assigned to an experimental, yoked, or control group condition. Under the experimental condition, a compensatory tracking task was switched between manual and automatic task modes based upon the participant's EEG. ERPs were also gathered to an auditory, oddball task. Participants in the yoked condition performed the same tasks under the exact sequence of task allocations that participants in the
more » ... ipants in the experimental group experienced. The control condition consisted of a random sequence of task allocations that was representative of each participant in the experimental group condition. Therefore, the design allowed a test of whether the performance and workload benefits seen in previous studies using this biocybernetic system were due to adaptive aiding or merely to the increase in task mode allocations. The results showed that the use of adaptive aiding improved performance and lowered subjective workload under Reproduced with perm ission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction prohibited without perm ission. negative feedback as predicted. Additionally, participants in the adaptive group had significantly lower tracking errors scores and NASA-TLX ratings than participants in either the yoked or control group conditions. Furthermore, the amplitudes of the N1 and P3 ERP components were significantly larger under the experimental group condition than under either the yoked or control group conditions. These results are discussed in terms of their implications for adaptive automation design. Reproduced with perm ission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction prohibited without permission. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Dr. Fred Freeman deserves a considerable amount of thanks for more than just helping me to complete this dissertation. For the past eight years, he has been so supportive and helpful that I don't think I would have completed my Ph.D. without him. Thank you very much. Thanks also to my committee members: Dr. Mark Scerbo, Dr. Peter Mikulka, and Dr. Alan Pope. Each of you had a significant impact on my education, and I greatly appreciate the considerable amount of time that you invested in helping me reach my educational goals. The other two people that deserve acknowledgment are Elizabeth Shirer and Kristen Koontz. I have known Elizabeth before I began college and, without her encouragement, I probably would be a 28 year old lifeguard right now. She has always been there for me, and I can't say enough to express how much I love and appreciate her. Kristen, we have been many things to each other, but always have been the greatest of friends. Thanks for being there for me. I will always love you. Reproduced with perm ission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction prohibited without permission.
doi:10.25777/j8b7-f895 fatcat:fymsdkgjorfr3k6uu2i5upoh6m