Royal Institution

1892 The Musical Times and Singing Class Circular  
JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range of content in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new forms of scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org. . Musical Times Publications Ltd. is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access to The Musical Times and Singing Class Circular.
more » ... Circular. http://www.jstor.org This content downloaded from 128.235.251.160 on Wed, 10 Dec 2014 22:59:17 PM All use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions young lady's future. The best of the vocal performances was that of Miss Minnie Robinson in Rebecca's air from *' Ivanhoe," and a word of praise should be given to Mr. B. P. Parker for his careful rendering of Raft's Concerto in D minor for violoncello. The Concert was conducted with his usual care and tact by Dr. A. C. Mackenzie. On March 30 and 3r and the ISt and 2nd ult. performances were given at this Institution by the operatic class directed with so much skill and energy by Mr. Betjemann. Act II. of Mozart's " Nozze," Act II. of Wfagner's " Dutchman," Act II. of Flotow's " Martha," and selections from Acts II. and IV. of " I1 Trovatore " were each played three times with diSerent casts, so arranged as to allow the same student to appear in diSerent roles. Among those whose singing and acting showed most promise may be named Misses . The difficult Fi1zale in Mozart's opera was exceedingly well done, and the women's chorus at the opening of the act from the " Dutchman " has in all probability never been so well sung or acted in this country Praise, too, is due to the stage ' business " generally, which testified alike to the intelligence of those concerned and to the excellence of their training. Mr. Betjemann, who of course conducted, might, in the matter of watchfulness, have given points to Argus. He was warmly congratulated on the efficiency shown by his pupils. The accompaniments were capitally played by ten students on stringed instruments, backed by Mr. Gilbert R. Betjemann at the pianoforte. Several competitions for prizes and scholarships have taken place at the Royal Academy of Music since our last issue, the first being for the Louisa Hopkins Memorial Prize, on March 26. The examiners were Mr. Graham P. Moore, Mesdames E Clinton Fynes and Alma Haas (in the chair). There were twenty-two candidates and the prize was awarded to Llewela Davies, the examiners highly commending Mabel Lyons and Ada Tunks. The competition for the Sterndale Bennett Scholarship took place on the 7th ult. The examiners were Messrs E. Prout, H. R. Rose, E. Sauret, T. Wingham and W. Mac farren (chairman). There were eleven candidates and the scholarship was awarded to Stanislaus Ssczepanowski the examiners highly commending Bernard C. Flanders. The competition for the Sterndale Bennett Prize took place on the same day. The examiners were Messrs. Waddington Cooke, Carlo Albanesi, and Miss Fanny Davies (in the chair). There were thirty-five candidates and the prize was awarded to Lavinia Powell. The examiners highly commended Ada Tunks and commended Mabel Lyons Lilias Pringle, and Edith Pratt. The competition for the Liszt Scholarship took place on Friday, the 8th ult. There were fourteen candidates, who had passed the Literary Examination held on Tuesday last, and of these the judges decided to recommend Miss Ida C. Betts to the trustees for election to the scholarship. The examiners were Mr Sapellnikoff, Professor Niecks, and Mr. Ed. Dannreuther (Chairman). The competition for the Parepa Rosa Scholarship was also decided on the same day. The examiners were Messrs. F. King, F. Walker, W. Nicholl, E. Fiori, and M. Garcia (in the chair). There were fifty candidates and the scholarship was awarded to Alice A. Simons. The examiners highly commended Dream," given complete with all the vocal parts. The choice of Mendelssohn's music was not altogether happy, for its proper execution requires an extreme delicacy, refinement, and finish which can scarcely be expected from performers still in a state of pupilage. It will easily be conceived that the fairy music hardly had full young lady's future. The best of the vocal performances was that of Miss Minnie Robinson in Rebecca's air from *' Ivanhoe," and a word of praise should be given to Mr. B. P. Parker for his careful rendering of Raft's Concerto in D minor for violoncello. The Concert was conducted with his usual care and tact by Dr. A. C. Mackenzie. On March 30 and 3r and the ISt and 2nd ult. performances were given at this Institution by the operatic class directed with so much skill and energy by Mr. Betjemann. Act II. of Mozart's " Nozze," Act II. of Wfagner's " Dutchman," Act II. of Flotow's " Martha," and selections from Acts II. and IV. of " I1 Trovatore " were each played three times with diSerent casts, so arranged as to allow the same student to appear in diSerent roles. Among those whose singing and acting showed most promise may be named Misses . The difficult Fi1zale in Mozart's opera was exceedingly well done, and the women's chorus at the opening of the act from the " Dutchman " has in all probability never been so well sung or acted in this country Praise, too, is due to the stage ' business " generally, which testified alike to the intelligence of those concerned and to the excellence of their training. Mr. Betjemann, who of course conducted, might, in the matter of watchfulness, have given points to Argus. He was warmly congratulated on the efficiency shown by his pupils. The accompaniments were capitally played by ten students on stringed instruments, backed by Mr. Gilbert R. Betjemann at the pianoforte. Several competitions for prizes and scholarships have taken place at the Royal Academy of Music since our last issue, the first being for the Louisa Hopkins Memorial Prize, on March 26. The examiners were Mr. Graham P. Moore, Mesdames E Clinton Fynes and Alma Haas (in the chair). There were twenty-two candidates and the prize was awarded to Llewela Davies, the examiners highly commending Mabel Lyons and Ada Tunks. The competition for the Sterndale Bennett Scholarship took place on the 7th ult. The examiners were Messrs E. Prout, H. R. Rose, E. Sauret, T. Wingham and W. Mac farren (chairman). There were eleven candidates and the scholarship was awarded to Stanislaus Ssczepanowski the examiners highly commending Bernard C. Flanders. The competition for the Sterndale Bennett Prize took place on the same day. The examiners were Messrs. Waddington Cooke, Carlo Albanesi, and Miss Fanny Davies (in the chair). There were thirty-five candidates and the prize was awarded to Lavinia Powell. The examiners highly commended Ada Tunks and commended Mabel Lyons Lilias Pringle, and Edith Pratt. The competition for the Liszt Scholarship took place on Friday, the 8th ult. There were fourteen candidates, who had passed the Literary Examination held on Tuesday last, and of these the judges decided to recommend Miss Ida C. Betts to the trustees for election to the scholarship. The examiners were Mr Sapellnikoff, Professor Niecks, and Mr. Ed. Dannreuther (Chairman). The competition for the Parepa Rosa Scholarship was also decided on the same day. The examiners were Messrs. F. King, F. Walker, W. Nicholl, E. Fiori, and M. Garcia (in the chair). There were fifty candidates and the scholarship was awarded to Alice A. Simons. The examiners highly commended Dream," given complete with all the vocal parts. The choice of Mendelssohn's music was not altogether happy, for its proper execution requires an extreme delicacy, refinement, and finish which can scarcely be expected from performers still in a state of pupilage. It will easily be conceived that the fairy music hardly had full young lady's future. The best of the vocal performances was that of Miss Minnie Robinson in Rebecca's air from *' Ivanhoe," and a word of praise should be given to Mr. B. P. Parker for his careful rendering of Raft's Concerto in D minor for violoncello. The Concert was conducted with his usual care and tact by Dr. A. C. Mackenzie. On March 30 and 3r and the ISt and 2nd ult. performances were given at this Institution by the operatic class directed with so much skill and energy by Mr. Betjemann. Act II. of Mozart's " Nozze," Act II. of Wfagner's " Dutchman," Act II. of Flotow's " Martha," and selections from Acts II. and IV. of " I1 Trovatore " were each played three times with diSerent casts, so arranged as to allow the same student to appear in diSerent roles. Among those whose singing and acting showed most promise may be named Misses . The difficult Fi1zale in Mozart's opera was exceedingly well done, and the women's chorus at the opening of the act from the " Dutchman " has in all probability never been so well sung or acted in this country Praise, too, is due to the stage ' business " generally, which testified alike to the intelligence of those concerned and to the excellence of their training. Mr. Betjemann, who of course conducted, might, in the matter of watchfulness, have given points to Argus. He was warmly congratulated on the efficiency shown by his pupils. The accompaniments were capitally played by ten students on stringed instruments, backed by Mr. Gilbert R. Betjemann at the pianoforte.
doi:10.2307/3362523 fatcat:v3rdj6gdz5e3dlhjw3yaati47u