Microaggressions, Discrimination, and Phenotype among African Americans: A Latent Class Analysis of the Impact of Skin Tone and BMI

Verna M. Keith, Ann W. Nguyen, Robert Joseph Taylor, Dawne M. Mouzon, Linda M. Chatters
2017 Sociological inquiry  
Data from the 2001-2003National Survey of American Life are used to investigate the effects of phenotype on everyday experiences with discrimination among African Americans (N=3343). Latent class analysis is used to identify four classes of discriminatory treatment: 1) low levels of discrimination, 2) disrespect and condescension, 3) character-based discrimination, and 4) high levels of discrimination. We then employ latent class multinomial logistic regression to evaluate the association
more » ... n skin tone and body weight and these four classes of discrimination. Designating the low level discrimination class as the reference group, findings revealed that respondents with darker skin were more likely to be classified into the disrespect/condescension and the high level microaggression types. BMI was unrelated to the discrimination type, although there was a significant interaction effect between gender and BMI. BMI was strongly and positively associated with membership in the disrespect and condescension type among men but not among women. These findings indicate that skin tone and body weight are two phenotypic characteristics that influence the type and frequency of discrimination experienced by African Americans. Microaggressions, Everyday Discrimination, and Phenotype among African Americans: A Latent Class Analysis of the Impact of Skin Tone and BMI
doi:10.1111/soin.12168 pmid:28603300 pmcid:PMC5464745 fatcat:h6falfqzmzd3bi5lwqpqlti4uu