Effect of extrusion conditions and hydrolysis with fiber-degrading enzymes on the production of C5 and C6 sugars from brewers' spent grain for bioethanol production

Erick Heredia-Olea, Esther Pérez-Carrillo, Sergio O. Serna-Saldívar
2015 Biofuel Research Journal  
Please cite this article as: Heredia-Olea E., Pérez-Carrillo E., Serna-Saldívar S.O. Effect of extrusion conditions and hydrolysis with fiber degrading enzymes in the production of C5 and C6 sugars from brewers' spent grain for bioethanol production. HIGHLIGHTS  Thermoplastic extrusion improved the enzymatic hydrolysis of brewers' spent grain.  The extruder barrel temperature and screw speed affected the sugars yield. No enzymatic and yeast inhibitors were detected in all enzymatic
more » ... ll enzymatic hydrolyzates.  Despite the high protein content after hydrolysis, low levels of FAN were achieved.  S. cerevisiae fermented glucose into ethanol with a maximum yield after 48 h. GRAPHICAL ABSTRACT ARTICLE INFO ABSTRACT Article history: The bioconversion of brewers' spent grain into bioethanol was investigated in the present study using thermoplastic extrusion and the use of fiber degrading enzymes. The extrusion conditions i.e. tempering moisture, screws speed, and temperature of last zone of the barrel were taken into account in order to optimize the yield of C5 and C6 sugars during the subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis step of the fibers. The most important variable that affected the sugar yield was the extrusion temperature, followed by the screws speed. The best extrusion conditions were 20% tempering moisture, 200 rpm and 50 °C. No enzymatic and yeast inhibitors were detected in any of the enzymatically-treated fiber hydrolyzates. The fermentation resulted in 5.43 mL bioethanol per 100g of extruded brewers' spent grain (dry weight basis). The only sugar consumed was glucose. The free amino nitrogen amount quantified in the hydrolyzates was as low as >20 mg L -1 , negatively affecting sugars consumption during the fermentation and consequently the ethanol yield.
doi:10.18331/brj2015.2.1.6 fatcat:lhebagqmrbdizhqm5jtp3kuso4