Plant Analysis and Fertilizer Problems. vol. 4. C. Bould, P. Prevot, and J. R. Magness, Eds. American Society for Horticultural Sciences, East Lansing, Mich., 1964. x + 430 pp. Illus. $7.50

J. C. Frazier
1965 Science  
Unfortunately, the papers in volume 4 are not organized by plant groups or analytical methods as the papers were in earlier volumes. The 29 papers in this volume may be divided into several groups based on interest; the largest group is concerned with aspects of the relationship between plant-tissue composition and growth and yield, and contains papers dealing with fruits (citrus, banana, pineapple, and grape), vegetables (potatoes, tomatoes, and peas), agronomic crops (cotton, sugar beets, and
more » ... n, sugar beets, and pasture grasses), and special plants (tea, tung, and Hevea rubber); a second group relates to the effects of various factors (weather, parasitic nematodes, salinity, soil sterilization, and growth regulators) on the mineral nutrition and tissue composition of plants, while a small group deals with certain biochemical aspects of mineral deficiencies in plants. Diagnoses of deficiency or excess of plant nutrients depend on plant symptoms and on soil and plant analyses, individually or in combination. Of the Horticultural Sciences Plant Analysis and Fertilizer Problems. vol. 4. C. Bould, P. Prevot, and J. R. Magness, Eds. American Society for Horticultural Sciences, East Lansing, Mich., 1964. x + 430 pp. Illus. $7.50. This volume, published by the American Society for Horticultural Science, covers the fourth colloquium on plant analysis and fertilizer problems held in conjunction with the 16th International Horticultural Congress (Brussels, Belgium) in September 1962. The first colloquium was in Paris in 1954 in connection with the Eighth International Botanical Congress, and the second, also in Paris, in 1956, was in connection with the Sixth International Congress of Soil Science. The first two were organized by, and the proceedings volumes published by, the Institut de Recherches pour les Huiles et Oleagineux, Paris. The third and fourth colloquia were organized by an international committee. The report of the third, held at Montreal in 1959 in connection with the Ninth International Botanical Congress, was published by the American Institute of Biological Sciences (1961). Unfortunately, the papers in volume 4 are not organized by plant groups or analytical methods as the papers were in earlier volumes. The 29 papers in this volume may be divided into several groups based on interest; the largest group is concerned with aspects of the relationship between plant-tissue composition and growth and yield, and contains papers dealing with fruits (citrus, banana, pineapple, and grape), vegetables (potatoes, tomatoes, and peas), agronomic crops (cotton, sugar beets, and pasture grasses), and special plants (tea, tung, and Hevea rubber); a second group relates to the effects of various factors (weather, parasitic nematodes, salinity, soil sterilization, and growth regulators) on the mineral nutrition and tissue composition of plants, while a small group deals with certain biochemical aspects of mineral deficiencies in plants. Diagnoses of deficiency or excess of plant nutrients depend on plant symptoms and on soil and plant analyses, individually or in combination. Of the three, plant analyses raise many distinct problems with respect to the sampling of specific plant organs, determining the correct physiological age for study, and interpreting results. Pres-20 AUGUST 1965 three, plant analyses raise many distinct problems with respect to the sampling of specific plant organs, determining the correct physiological age for study, and interpreting results. Pres- AUGUST 1965 ent knowledge of the relationship between the concentration of nutrients in plant tissues and the growth and yield potentials of agricultural plants is admittedly inadequate. In general, the series emphasizes the progressive advances in the analysis of plant tissues and valid interpretation of the results. This volume is printed on good quality paper and is well bound. It indicates a continued worldwide interest in the field by an ever-increasing group of workers. Its bibliographies substantially extend the body of literature in the field. The last chapter, as in previous volumes, indicates not only progress made to date but also sets forth as clearly the unsolved problems. Everyone interested in soil fertility and mineral nutrition must consider this series of colloquia. The fifth colloquium, organized by James A. Cook (Department of Viticulture, University of California, Davis) will be held in connection with the 17th International Horticultural Congress, at the University of Maryland, in August 1966. ent knowledge of the relationship between the concentration of nutrients in plant tissues and the growth and yield potentials of agricultural plants is admittedly inadequate. In general, the series emphasizes the progressive advances in the analysis of plant tissues and valid interpretation of the results. This volume is printed on good quality paper and is well bound. It indicates a continued worldwide interest in the field by an ever-increasing group of workers. Its bibliographies substantially extend the body of literature in the field. The last chapter, as in previous volumes, indicates not only progress made to date but also sets forth as clearly the unsolved problems. Everyone interested in soil fertility and mineral nutrition must consider this series of colloquia. The fifth colloquium, organized by James A. Cook (Department of Viticulture, University of California, Davis) will be held in connection with the 17th International Horticultural Congress, at the University of Maryland, in August 1966.
doi:10.1126/science.149.3686.853 fatcat:cy6x7va3zjesnht5iprl5b3rvi