List of Plants in My Florida Herbarium

A. S. Hitchcock
1897 Transactions of the Annual Meetings of the Kansas Academy of Science  
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more » ... out Early Journal Content at http://about.jstor.org/participate--jstor/individuals/early-journal--content. JSTOR is a digital library of academic journals, books, and primary source objects. JSTOR helps people discover, use, and build upon a wide range of content through a powerful research and teaching platform, and preserves this content for future generations. JSTOR is part of ITHAKA, a not--for--profit organization that also includes Ithaka S+R and Portico. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org. 108 KANSAS ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. 5 p. m. Mentzelia ornata, great mentzelia; close in the morning to reopen in the evening. Silene noctiflora, evening catchfly; wilt next morning. Oenothera triloba, cone-stem evening-primrose; last nearly all next day. 6 p. nm. Abronia fragrans; wilt early in the morning. Datura stramonium, jimson; wilt next morning. Convolvulus repens, evening beauty; close next morning. Gaura coccinea, scarlet gaura; flowers turn pink next morning and fade about 11 a. m. Oenothera watsoni, stemless evening primrose; last all next day. Oenothera biennis, tall evening-primrose; wilt next day. Heliotropium convolvulaceum, sweet-scented heliotrope; wilt next day. Oenothera rhombipetala, point-petaled evening-primrose; wilt next day about 9 to 10 a. m. Oenothera sinuata, small-flowered evening-primrose; wilt next day. Oenothera hartwegi; wilt at 10 a. m. next day. 7 p. m. Oenothera missouriensis, Missouri evening-primrose; wilt at sunrise. Oenothera grandiflora, large evening primrose; open very promptly; wilt at 7 a. m. next day. Oenothera canescens, pink evening-primrose; wilt next morning. Oenothera fremontii; open promptly; wilt at 9 a. m. next day. Cephalanthus occidentalis, button-bush. 8 p. m. Gaura biennis; wilt promptly at 10 a. m. next day. Gaura parviflora; wilt about 11 a. m. next day. 9 p. 1n. Gaura (Stenosiphon) linifolia; flowers last and remain white all next day. There are many other plants that open at periodic times; but observations upon them have not been sufficient to determine positively their habits. (The "clock" contains the names of a few cultivated plants in parentheses.) LIST OF PLANTS IN MY FLORIDA HERBARIUM. A. S. HITCHCOCK, MANHATTAN. Read (by title) before the Academy December 30, 1898. The list presented is based entirely upon plants in my herbarium. There are yet a number of specimens that remain unidentified, especially among the palms, pines, and the genera Paspalum and Panicum. Others have been somewhat doubtfully referred to certain species though they show some differences and may ultimately prove to be new species. But it seems best to leave the description of new species to those who have access to the large herbaria. For the sake of brevity, the collector's name is represented by his initial in most cases. These initials are: C = Mr. A. H. Curtiss, sets of North American plants. N = Mr. Geo. V. Nash, sets of Florida plants. R= -Prof. P. H. Rolfs, Lake City, Florida Agricultural College, who has given me much help in the work. W = Mr. H. J. Webber, Department of Agriculture, Washington, for several years stationed at Eustis. S = Mr. J. H. Simpson, plants distributed by the Department of Agriculture. 108 KANSAS ACADEMY OF SCIENCE. 5 p. m. Mentzelia ornata, great mentzelia; close in the morning to reopen in the evening. Silene noctiflora, evening catchfly; wilt next morning. Oenothera triloba, cone-stem evening-primrose; last nearly all next day. 6 p. nm. Abronia fragrans; wilt early in the morning. Datura stramonium, jimson; wilt next morning. Convolvulus repens, evening beauty; close next morning. Gaura coccinea, scarlet gaura; flowers turn pink next morning and fade about 11 a. m. Oenothera watsoni, stemless evening primrose; last all next day. Oenothera biennis, tall evening-primrose; wilt next day. Heliotropium convolvulaceum, sweet-scented heliotrope; wilt next day. Oenothera rhombipetala, point-petaled evening-primrose; wilt next day about 9 to 10 a. m. Oenothera sinuata, small-flowered evening-primrose; wilt next day. Oenothera hartwegi; wilt at 10 a. m. next day. 7 p. m. Oenothera missouriensis, Missouri evening-primrose; wilt at sunrise. Oenothera grandiflora, large evening primrose; open very promptly; wilt at 7 a. m. next day. Oenothera canescens, pink evening-primrose; wilt next morning. Oenothera fremontii; open promptly; wilt at 9 a. m. next day. Cephalanthus occidentalis, button-bush. 8 p. m. Gaura biennis; wilt promptly at 10 a. m. next day. Gaura parviflora; wilt about 11 a. m. next day. 9 p. 1n. Gaura (Stenosiphon) linifolia; flowers last and remain white all next day. There are many other plants that open at periodic times; but observations upon them have not been sufficient to determine positively their habits. (The "clock" contains the names of a few cultivated plants in parentheses.) LIST OF PLANTS IN MY FLORIDA HERBARIUM. A. S. HITCHCOCK, MANHATTAN. Read (by title) before the Academy December 30, 1898. The list presented is based entirely upon plants in my herbarium. There are yet a number of specimens that remain unidentified, especially among the palms, pines, and the genera Paspalum and Panicum. Others have been somewhat doubtfully referred to certain species though they show some differences and may ultimately prove to be new species. But it seems best to leave the description of new species to those who have access to the large herbaria. For the sake of brevity, the collector's name is represented by his initial in most cases. These initials are: C = Mr. A. H. Curtiss, sets of North American plants. N = Mr. Geo. V. Nash, sets of Florida plants. R= -Prof. P. H. Rolfs, Lake City, Florida Agricultural College, who has given me much help in the work. W = Mr. H. J. Webber, Department of Agriculture, Washington, for several years stationed at Eustis. S = Mr. J. H. Simpson, plants distributed by the Department of Agriculture. PHYTOLOGY AND THERAPEUTICS. Many of these are without number or locality other than "Florida," but are from the region south of Tampa. P = Plants from the Keys recently distributed by Messrs. Pollard, Collins, and Morris. H = My own collection. The first series was obtained in June and July of 1894 at Eustis and vicinity. While here Messrs. Webber and Swingle gave me much valuable assistance. The second series was obtained in the winter of 1895-'96, along the east coast, from Palm Beach to Cocoanut Grove, on Biscayne Bay. Under the latter locality are included collections from Cape Florida. A few labeled East Florida were collected at various places on the way down, chiefly at Jacksonville and St. Augustine. The third series was obtained during the summer of 1898 on a trip on foot from Monticello to Bayport following the line of railroad to Live Oak, Branford, Archer, Dunellon, Fitzgerald, and Brooksville. The plants collected on this trip are labeled by counties. Those labeled Columbia county were collected in the southern part, and so are distinguished from those collected at Lake City. RANUNCULACEAE. Nash. Tampa, N 2472. This is included under S. elliotti in the Synoptical Flora, but Nash's specimen does not have the aspect of that species as I have seen it growing in Florida. R 399; Kissimee, R 326; Mosquito Lagoon, C 1393; --, S. 636. Parthenium hysterophorus, L. Key West, C 5649; another specimen from Curtiss which has by mistake the label for 1508.
doi:10.2307/3623710 fatcat:vrabe6kptbg6ngh6dbzgmcn42a