Effect of nitrogen addition on carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes in temperate forest litter and soil

N. Wu, Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110 164, China, H. Qian, Y. Tan, Y. Wang, School of Municipal and Environmental Engineering, Shenyang Jianzhu University, Shenyang 110 168, China, School of Municipal and Environmental Engineering, Shenyang Jianzhu University, Shenyang 110 168, China, China Energy Engineering, Corporation Limited, Liaoning Institute, Shenyang-110 179, China
2018 Journal of environmental biology  
Aim : Methodology : Results : Interpretation : The aim of this study was to investigate the changes of litter and soil carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes in temperate forest ecosystem under nitrogen addition. In a mixed broad-leaf Korean pine forest in Changbai Mountain, China after 6 years of -2 -1 nitrogen addition (50 kg·ha ·yr ) treatment, the content of organic carbon and nitrogen, stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen in litter and soil layer were determined by elemental analyzer and
more » ... tal analyzer and isotope ratio mass spectrometer. The results showed that the carbon concentration decreased with soil depth in the control and treatment samples. The nitrogen concentration had a tendency to increase in the decomposed litter layer. Nitrogen addition did not show significant effect on carbon and nitrogen concentration. The carbon stable 13 isotope ( C) was about -27‰ in forest cover layer and organic matter layer, while it was as high as -25.3‰ 13 in mineral soil layer. Nitrogen addition had no significant effect on the value of C. The range of nitrogen 15 15 stable isotope ( N) was -1.6 ~ 5.5‰, which increased with the depth of soil. N value increased significantly (P = 0.039) in the decomposed litter layer under nitrogen addition. 15 15 N enrichment implied that more N was remaining under nitrogen addition. This 15 indicated that nitrogen deposition enhanced the decomposition of organic matter implied by N enrichment in the decomposed litter layer, although carbon content did not show significant change. This study provides a data support for further studies on the effects of nitrogen deposition on forest ecosystems.
doi:10.22438/jeb/39/6/mrn-779 fatcat:7nudhh6lbbfpvewckwvmawc4be