Needs, Aggravation, And Degree Of Burnout In Informal Care Providers Of Patients With Chronic Cvd [post]

2020 unpublished
KEYWORDS informal caretaker, met and unmet needs, growing burnout. 2 Abstract Abstract Background. A growing number of patients with chronic cardiovascular disease (CVD) creates a growing demand for homecare. Personal and professional limitations, health issues, and lack of systemic support of informal care providers are major causes of insufficient care models for chronically ill patients in home environments. This study aimed to identify the sociodemographic variables that are associated with
more » ... are associated with the needs and increasing occupational burnout observed among home care providers. Methods. This study reports on 161 informal home care providers of patients with CVDs. The research was conducted in the homes of patients, using the Camberwell Assessment of Need Short Appraisal Schedule (CANSAS), the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), and a structured interview questionnaire developed by the authors. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient test and logistic regression were used for analyses. Results. The majority of the participants were female (70.2%; n=113). We found that younger care providers were less likely to report unmet needs ( p = 0.011), and less likely to report burnout as measured by the MBI Emotional Exhaustion ( p = 0.010) and Depersonalization ( p = 0.009) subscales. Care providers with primary education were more likely to report burnout on the MBI Depersonalization subscale ( p = 0.028). In addition, care providers who worked more often reported higher levels of met needs ( p = 0.022), and burnout as measured on the MBI Depersonalization ( p = 0.005) and Emotional Exhaustion ( p = 0.018) subscales. Subjects residing in urban areas were more likely to report unmet needs ( p = 0.007), and were also more likely to report burnout as measured on the MBI Emotional Exhaustion ( p = 0.006) subscale. Conclusion. Older care providers who are unemployed and reside in cities and unemployed should be targeted with directed programmes to determine the category of unmet needs, and for personalized support. Care providers with these demographic characteristics should be targeted for occupational burnout prevention programmes. Keywords: informal caretaker, met and unmet needs, growing burnout.
doi:10.21203/rs.2.22958/v2 fatcat:7e6ffgzddvfgfjexpndib7dplu