Royal free Hospital. ULCER OF THE STOMACH TREATED SUCCESSFULLY: RELAPSE

W. Brinton
1855 BMJ (Clinical Research Edition)  
Surgeon to the Infirmary. CASES of secondary hemorrhage after amputation give much anxiety to surgeons, and decisive measures are generally necessary to stop the bleeding. I mean, of course, to allude to hemorrhage following the separation of the ligatures, at the interval of a week, ten days, or a fortnight after the operation, when the stump is more or less healed, and not to the heemorrhage dependent upon insecure ligatures occurring within thirty-six hours of the operation. I do not
more » ... n. I do not believe, as has been asserted, that secondary hemorthage is more common after flap amputations than after operations by the circular incision. The mode of arresting the bleeding is determined partly by the degree to which union of the flaps has advanced, and partly by the place at which the amputation has been performed. This latter point has not been sufficiently insisted upon by surgical authors. The following three cases, which were under treatment some time ago at the Bristol Royal Infirmary, will illustrate my meaning. The first in order of time was under my own care.
doi:10.1136/bmj.s3-3.156.1145-a fatcat:kdyl25pq65bevi7yzjpojjhfhy