Stated Meeting, Oct. 20, 1871

Edw. D. Cope
1871 Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society  
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more » ... out Early Journal Content at http://about.jstor.org/participate--jstor/individuals/early-journal--content. JSTOR is a digital library of academic journals, books, and primary source objects. JSTOR helps people discover, use, and build upon a wide range of content through a powerful research and teaching platform, and preserves this content for future generations. JSTOR is part of ITHAKA, a not--for--profit organization that also includes Ithaka S+R and Portico. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org. retical and practical, of the highest topics, not only of science, but of philosophy. Contented to accept no truth upon the evidence of mere tra_ dition or human authority, his opinions upon religious subjects, being those held by the Society of Friends of which lie was a member, were the result of deliberate and strong conviction. His fine critical faculty was brought to bear upon the recent Biblical and anti-Biblical controversies, represented, upon the one side, in different modes, by Strauss, Bauer, Comte, Renan and Buckle. In several essays, prepared for special occasions, only one of which, however, has been published, he displayed a calm mastery of these topics, an amount of knowledge and force of argument, such as might be looked for rather in a professed theologian than in an active member of the medical profession. With all who knew Dr. Edward Rhoads, however, his intellectual endowments, though great, were always perceived to be subordinated to moral qualities more rare and admirable. From early youth, purity of life, unselfishness, refinement and elevation of mind, were his marked characteristics. Few examples so spotless are met with in any profession or sphere of life. In the large assembly which met at his funeral, words spoken by several who knew him well, and whose standard of character was high, were such as might fulfil the aspirations of the most saintly of men, and which very few, indeed, could deserve, Stated Meeting, Oct. 20, 1871. Present, nine members. Curator, DR. CARSON, in the chair. A letter, acknowledging receipt of No. 86 proceedings, was received from the University of the City of New York. Donations for the Library were received from the Revue Politique; the Astronomer Royal of England; the Editors of Nature; the R. Institute of Cornwall; Thomas P. James, Esq.; the Editor of the Old and New; the American Chemist; American Journal of Medical Sciences, and Medical News and Library. A letter was read from Professor Cope to the Secretary, dated Fort Wallace, Kansas, 10th month 9, 1871, giving a preliminary report of his expedition into the Valley of the retical and practical, of the highest topics, not only of science, but of philosophy. Contented to accept no truth upon the evidence of mere tra_ dition or human authority, his opinions upon religious subjects, being those held by the Society of Friends of which lie was a member, were the result of deliberate and strong conviction. His fine critical faculty was brought to bear upon the recent Biblical and anti-Biblical controversies, represented, upon the one side, in different modes, by Strauss, Bauer, Comte, Renan and Buckle. In several essays, prepared for special occasions, only one of which, however, has been published, he displayed a calm mastery of these topics, an amount of knowledge and force of argument, such as might be looked for rather in a professed theologian than in an active member of the medical profession. [Oct. 20,1871. our explorations were attended with success. When we shifted camp, it was to go to Eagle Tail in Colorado, whence we returned again to Fossil Spring. The richness of this locality was again apparent, and we added to our collection a number of species. Among these may be mentioned Liodon ictericus Cope and two new Clidastes. The writer originally pointed out the existence of representatives of the orders Pythonomorpha and Sauropterygra, in this cretaceous basin. Prof. Marsh's explorations determined the existence of Ornithosauria and Grocodilia. The present investigation adds Dinosauria and perhaps Testudinata, or the group that the new form Protostega Cope represents. The preceding account expresses some of the points of interest observed. These, with others, now unnoticed, will be included in a final report. The giants of this sea were the Liodon proriger, Cope, L. dyspelor, Cope, Polycotylus latipinnis, Cope, and Elasmosaurus platyurus, Cope. Of these the first was apparently the most abundant. The second was the most elongate, exceeding in length perhaps any other known reptile. The last named had the most massive body, and exhibited an extraordinary appearance in consequence of the great length of its neck.
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