Review: English Composition in Theory and Practice [review-book]

John Maxwell Crowe
1910 The School Review  
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more » ... out Early Journal Content at http://about.jstor.org/participate--jstor/individuals/early-journal--content. JSTOR is a digital library of academic journals, books, and primary source objects. JSTOR helps people discover, use, and build upon a wide range of content through a powerful research and teaching platform, and preserves this content for future generations. JSTOR is part of ITHAKA, a not--for--profit organization that also includes Ithaka S+R and Portico. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org. covering some 115 pages, consists of exercises and problems for the student, classified according to chapter, and numbering almost seven hundred. Just what "the critical period" is the reader may have difficulty in deciding, since it is nowhere specifically stated. From the references to education in the home and by governesses, the phrase seems to refer to the period of childhood up to adolescence, or perhaps only to the first half of that period. In discussing group education Professor O'Shea properly emphasizes the influence exerted by the group upon its members, the significance and value of leadership, play, rivalry, and competition, as well as of group loyalty. The problems of training cover a wide variety of topics among which is that of the qualifications of a successful trainer and teacher. Imitation, which bulks so large in many treatises on social psychology and education, is left to the last and occupies a relatively small place in the book. On the other hand, such topics as corporal punishment, which at least is not peculiarly a matter of social education, are given considerable attention. On the whole the book is well written and extremely suggestive, containing much of great value to teachers and parents as well as to students of education. Every chapter gives evidence of extensive and accurate observation of child life, keen psychological analysis of child activities, and, what is more unusual, sympathetic insight. The shortcomings on the other hand, are largely those of the subject, due to its newness and to the lack of agreement among students as to the proper limits of the field. Social Development and Education is undoubtedly the best book that has yet appeared in its field, at least in English, and, whether better books appear later or not, it will possess a permanent value on account of its psychological analysis and its practical and sane discussions of the problems of social education. Co., I909. Pp. 425. $0.40. One of the interesting problems concerning English composition is coming to be the differentiation between high-school and college courses. The new book from the Sheffield Scientific School is an exellent illustration of the present uncertainty in this regard. Published without assignment, in title, preface, or introduction, to any kind of school, it is presumably intended for college work. Yet the material is almost entirely that which is useful in the covering some 115 pages, consists of exercises and problems for the student, classified according to chapter, and numbering almost seven hundred. Just what "the critical period" is the reader may have difficulty in deciding, since it is nowhere specifically stated. From the references to education in the home and by governesses, the phrase seems to refer to the period of childhood up to adolescence, or perhaps only to the first half of that period. In discussing group education Professor O'Shea properly emphasizes the influence exerted by the group upon its members, the significance and value of leadership, play, rivalry, and competition, as well as of group loyalty. The problems of training cover a wide variety of topics among which is that of the qualifications of a successful trainer and teacher. Imitation, which bulks so large in many treatises on social psychology and education, is left to the last and occupies a relatively small place in the book. On the other hand, such topics as corporal punishment, which at least is not peculiarly a matter of social education, are given considerable attention. On the whole the book is well written and extremely suggestive, containing much of great value to teachers and parents as well as to students of education. Every chapter gives evidence of extensive and accurate observation of child life, keen psychological analysis of child activities, and, what is more unusual, sympathetic insight. The shortcomings on the other hand, are largely those of the subject, due to its newness and to the lack of agreement among students as to the proper limits of the field. Social Development and Education is undoubtedly the best book that has yet appeared in its field, at least in English, and, whether better books appear later or not, it will possess a permanent value on account of its psychological analysis and its practical and sane discussions of the problems of social education.
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