Just Judge of Heaven (Psalm 43)

G. M. Garrett
1872 The Musical Times and Singing Class Circular  
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more » ... , and of the Pateq lCosteq. The style of the whole is decidedly modern, but totally free from the extremely high colouring which disfigures some of the Church music of the present day. Even in the harmony to the Plain Song for the Stls?l,r) C7oqSZa, which is given in addition to an original setting of the text, there is no &ssumption of the &ntique for, at the close, & second inversion of the subdominant chord precedes the final tonic as an appoggiatura,-one of the devices peculiar to l&ter times,and the entire character is as free as it is pure. The expressive melody to the Kyqxe is &ssigned to the soprano for the first three responses, is given to the tenor with a different harmony for the next three, and to all the choir in octaves with an independent organ part for the three following, &nd the original form is resumed for the tenth response, to be extended at the change of words. In the GreZo, the great difEiculty is met with success, of giving a fair declamation of the text vwith considerable expression, and xlot repeating a word. Composers for the English Church are cruelly fettered in comparison with those who write for the Roman Service, in being for the most part precluded from the development of & musical idea, from the giving expansion to their thoughts, by the general requirement that the words be but once utteredand he is indeed to be praised, who can represent the subject, and can frame a clear musical design, under this restriction. The maUtter to which are set forth the attributes of Our Lord, recurs pertinently &t the description of the third person of the Trinity-by such artifices &S this is music ma.de to illustrate powerfully the text, reflecting one passage upon another, and thus enforcing both. The sanGtus is set, &ccording to the terms of the exhortation, which invite the communicants to join " with Angels and Archangels, and with &11 the company of he&ven," in their everlasting song of praise, to a loud exulting strain The choice is difficult between the reading thus implied if not demanded, and that which might better render the feelings of the people, chastened and softened &S these must be by the ceremony and its mysteries. Mr. Agutter h&s made his selection upon high authority, and there are many occasions to which it will be the more &ppropriate. On the contrary, he closes the Benedctlts by setting the words " Hosallna in the highest " to be sung in & whisper. The text is an interpolation, £or which, of course, the musician is irresponsible; but surely, if they require, who insert in this place the triumphant passage from St. Matthew's Gospel, a piece of subdued character, they should furnish the composer +rith words better suited to such treatment. The best piece in the Service is, to our thinking, the A^qnt6s. This is a soprano solo of some extent7 interspersed with choral phrases to the '< Miserere " and the 'vDona.i? The melody is tender, and its expression is intensified at each repetition by skilful variety of accompaniment. Here the softness of the music is as fitting to the sentiment of the words as it may be to the feelings of the auditory. The Lord?s Prayer is a mixture of chanting and rhythmical song, the latter beginning with the glorification. It is not now to discuss the propriety of such hybrid composition; if ever it be accept3ble, the example before us claims to be well received. This Service shows the church of St. Peter Streatham, to be fortunate in its Prsecentor and Organist, which offices are filled by the author-and Dr. Stainex is honoured in the dedication of so meritorious a work. JlTst Judge of iIeaven (;Psalm 43). Set to music for contralto solo and chorus, by G. M. Garrett Mus. D. DR.. GARRETT here presents us with an admirable specimen of musicianship. Had he done no more than this his professional reputation might ha,ve been enhanced and nothing more. Happily, hosrever, he has done more-much moreand the musical public are gainers by the acquisition of a Cantata imbued with much charnl of both melody and harmony. It would hardly be saying too much to state that what Mendelssohns " Hear my prayer " is to the solo soprano, this Psalm is to the contralto-so thoroughly genial and beautiful is the music. Whilst compositions like these are adopted as ameatls of worshipin our cathedrals, we need never fear that the work of developnzent alld reform, so lately and so vigorously begun, will terminate, until all -muslc (whether it be old or new) wkwh ts tl}-DWOl'tZly shall have been utterly swept out of the Sanctuary. God so loved the world. Anthem, by Hamiltoll (:larke TH13RE is much smooth writing in this work, and it does not lack variety. Mr. Clarke has chosen a by no means easy set of words. (' Peradventure " is a long word and covers much musical grollnd without being as full of meaning as of the Agn26s Des, and of the Pateq lCosteq. The style of the whole is decidedly modern, but totally free from the extremely high colouring which disfigures some of the Church music of the present day. Even in the harmony to the Plain Song for the Stls?l,r) C7oqSZa, which is given in addition to an original setting of the text, there is no &ssumption of the &ntique for, at the close, & second inversion of the subdominant chord precedes the final tonic as an appoggiatura,-one of the devices peculiar to l&ter times,and the entire character is as free as it is pure. The expressive melody to the Kyqxe is &ssigned to the soprano for the first three responses, is given to the tenor with a different harmony for the next three, and to all the choir in octaves with an independent organ part for the three following, &nd the original form is resumed for the tenth response, to be extended at the change of words. In the GreZo, the great difEiculty is met with success, of giving a fair declamation of the text vwith considerable expression, and xlot repeating a word. Composers for the English Church are cruelly fettered in comparison with those who write for the Roman Service, in being for the most part precluded from the development of & musical idea, from the giving expansion to their thoughts, by the general requirement that the words be but once utteredand he is indeed to be praised, who can represent the subject, and can frame a clear musical design, under this restriction. The maUtter to which are set forth the attributes of Our Lord, recurs pertinently &t the description of the third person of the Trinity-by such artifices &S this is music ma.de to illustrate powerfully the text, reflecting one passage upon another, and thus enforcing both. The sanGtus is set, &ccording to the terms of the exhortation, which invite the communicants to join " with Angels and Archangels, and with &11 the company of he&ven," in their everlasting song of praise, to a loud exulting strain The choice is difficult between the reading thus implied if not demanded, and that which might better render the feelings of the people, chastened and softened &S these must be by the ceremony and its mysteries. Mr. Agutter h&s made his selection upon high authority, and there are many occasions to which it will be the more &ppropriate. On the contrary, he closes the Benedctlts by setting the words " Hosallna in the highest " to be sung in & whisper. The text is an interpolation, £or which, of course, the musician is irresponsible; but surely, if they require, who insert in this place the triumphant passage from St. Matthew's Gospel, a piece of subdued character, they should furnish the composer +rith words better suited to such treatment. The best piece in the Service is, to our thinking, the A^qnt6s. This is a soprano solo of some extent7 interspersed with choral phrases to the '< Miserere " and the 'vDona.i? The melody is tender, and its expression is intensified at each repetition by skilful variety of accompaniment. Here the softness of the music is as fitting to the sentiment of the words as it may be to the feelings of the auditory. The Lord?s Prayer is a mixture of chanting and rhythmical song, the latter beginning with the glorification. It is not now to discuss the propriety of such hybrid composition; if ever it be accept3ble, the example before us claims to be well received. This Service shows the church of St. Peter Streatham, to be fortunate in its Prsecentor and Organist, which offices are filled by the author-and Dr. Stainex is honoured in the dedication of so meritorious a work. JlTst Judge of iIeaven (;Psalm 43). Set to music for contralto solo and chorus, by G. M. Garrett Mus. D. DR.. GARRETT here presents us with an admirable specimen of musicianship. Had he done no more than this his professional reputation might ha,ve been enhanced and nothing more. Happily, hosrever, he has done more-much moreand the musical public are gainers by the acquisition of a Cantata imbued with much charnl of both melody and harmony. It would hardly be saying too much to state that what Mendelssohns " Hear my prayer " is to the solo soprano, this Psalm is to the contralto-so thoroughly genial and beautiful is the music. Whilst compositions like these are adopted as ameatls of worshipin our cathedrals, we need never fear that the work of developnzent alld reform, so lately and so vigorously begun, will terminate, until all -muslc (whether it be old or new) wkwh ts tl}-DWOl'tZly shall have been utterly swept out of the Sanctuary. God so loved the world. Anthem, by Hamiltoll (:larke TH13RE is much smooth writing in this work, and it does not lack variety. Mr. Clarke has chosen a by no means easy set of words. (' Peradventure " is a long word and covers much musical grollnd without being as full of meaning as of the Agn26s Des, and of the Pateq lCosteq. The style of the whole is decidedly modern, but totally free from the extremely high colouring which disfigures some of the Church music of the present day. Even in the harmony to the Plain Song for the Stls?l,r) C7oqSZa, which is given in addition to an original setting of the text, there is no &ssumption of the &ntique for, at the close, & second inversion of the subdominant chord precedes the final tonic as an appoggiatura,-one of the devices peculiar to l&ter times,and the entire character is as free as it is pure. The expressive melody to the Kyqxe is &ssigned to the soprano for the first three responses, is given to the tenor with a different harmony for the next three, and to all the choir in octaves with an independent organ part for the three following, &nd the original form is resumed for the tenth response, to be extended at the change of words. In the GreZo, the great difEiculty is met with success, of giving a fair declamation of the text vwith considerable expression, and xlot repeating a word. Composers for the English Church are cruelly fettered in comparison with those who write for the Roman Service, in being for the most part precluded from the development of & musical idea, from the giving expansion to their thoughts, by the general requirement that the words be but once utteredand he is indeed to be praised, who can represent the subject, and can frame a clear musical design, under this restriction. The maUtter to which are set forth the attributes of Our Lord, recurs pertinently &t the description of the third person of the Trinity-by such artifices &S this is music ma.de to illustrate powerfully the text, reflecting one passage upon another, and thus enforcing both. The sanGtus is set, &ccording to the terms of the exhortation, which invite the communicants to join " with Angels and Archangels, and with &11 the company of he&ven," in their everlasting song of praise, to a loud exulting strain The choice is difficult between the reading thus implied if not demanded, and that which might better render the feelings of the people, chastened and softened &S these must be by the ceremony and its mysteries. Mr. Agutter h&s made his selection upon high authority, and there are many occasions to which it will be the more &ppropriate. On the contrary, he closes the Benedctlts by setting the words " Hosallna in the highest " to be sung in & whisper. The text is an interpolation, £or which, of course, the musician is irresponsible; but surely, if they require, who insert in this place the triumphant passage from St. Matthew's Gospel, a piece of subdued character, they should furnish the composer +rith words better suited to such treatment. The best piece in the Service is, to our thinking, the A^qnt6s. This is a soprano solo of some extent7 interspersed with choral phrases to the '< Miserere " and the 'vDona.i? The melody is tender, and its expression is intensified at each repetition by skilful variety of accompaniment. Here the softness of the music is as fitting to the sentiment of the words as it may be to the feelings of the auditory. The Lord?s Prayer is a mixture of chanting and rhythmical song, the latter beginning with the glorification. It is not now to discuss the propriety of such hybrid composition; if ever it be accept3ble, the example before us claims to be well received. This Service shows the church of St. Peter Streatham, to be fortunate in its Prsecentor and Organist, which offices are filled by the author-and Dr. Stainex is honoured in the dedication of so meritorious a work. JlTst Judge of iIeaven (;Psalm 43). Set to music for contralto solo and chorus, by G. M. Garrett Mus. D.
doi:10.2307/3354080 fatcat:ju2cplie6bhl3pp4ibbhtgzs4e