Does Financial & Social Development are Important for Economic Growth? An International Scenario

Abdul Rehman, Irum Saba, Rehana Kousar
2020 Journal of Business and Social Review in Emerging Economies  
Financial and Social Development plays pivotal role in the economic growth of nations. Developed countries have strong financial and social infrastructure. This study focuses on the social and financial development in relation to economic growth of developed, developing and frontier economies. Gross Domestic product (GDP) per capita used as dependent variable. Domestic credit, market capitalization, turnover ratio, household consumption, foreign direct investment, capital formation, Co2
more » ... mation, Co2 Emission and trade openness are used as independent variables. government expenditures on education and current health expenditures are use as social variables. Unemployment and inflation rate also use as control variables. Pooled OLS (ordinary least squares), fixed effects and random effects models are used to check the relationship among variables from 2001-2017. Results show positive and significant relation between Gross Domestic product (GDP) Domestic credit, education expenditures and health expenditures in case of developing countries. Market capitalization, turnover ratio, foreign direct investment, and trade openness have a positive but insignificant relationship. Co2 Emission, inflation and unemployment rate have negative and insignificant relation with GDP per capita. In advanced countries Inflation rate trade openness and FDI have positive and significant relation with GDP per capita. Domestic credit, market capitalization, turnover ratio, household final consumption and Co2 Emission have a negative relation with GDP per capita. Education and health also have a negative and insignificant relation with GDP per capita. In Frontier economies there is a positive and insignificant relation of market capitalization, FDI, Co2 Emission and health expenditures with GDP per capita. capital formation, turnover ratio, household consumption, trade openness has negative and significant relation with per capita. Education expenditures have positive and significant relation with GDP per capita. Co2 have positive but insignificant relation. Inflation and unemployment rate have negative but insignificant relation with GDP per capita.
doi:10.26710/jbsee.v5i2.923 fatcat:ncqqclkck5fe7kft4ai6ytpvrq