Hushed in Death

Henry Hiles, Henry Lahee, Alfred J. Caldicott
1878 The Musical Times and Singing Class Circular  
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more » ... JUNE I, I878. THE MUSICAL TIMES. JUNE I, I878. THE MUSICAL TIMES. JUNE I, I878. 339 339 339 of the original. Especially interesting is the chorus " Oh, be joyful," with its parts for horns, flutes, oboes, clarionets, and bassoons; and not less so the beautifu} duet, " Be ye sure that the Lord He is God," throughout which a judicious use of the wind instruments gives colour and variety alike charming. But we need not discuss details. Franz is now acknowledged as the prince of musical " restorers," and our duty is done when we have called attention to the works upon which his skill has been lavished. H7cshed zat Desth. A Serious Glee for S.A.T.B., by Henry Hiles, Mus. Doc., Oxorl. Hence, loathed Melvzncholy ! A Cheerful Glee for five voicesf by Henry Lahee. Hmpty Dl¢^ntty. Humorous Glee by Alfred J. Caldicott, Mus. Bac., Cantab. [Novello, Ever and Co.] LET US take this opportunity of thanking the worthy members of the Manchester Gentlemen's Glee Club for doing good suit and service to a distinctively English branch of musical art, not only by promoting a knowledge of works already existing, but by stimulating the produc. tion of others. There are, we are glad to say, many associations throughout the kingdom which keep alive regard for the ancient forms of national song. but beyond this do little or nothing to perpetuate them. The members of those associations should be better advised. They should call to mind the fact that in art as for example, in the case of our English oak, as soon as growth stops decay begins, and that real vitality always implies a power of accretion. We do not know whether the Manchester Gentlemen's Glee Club systematically recognises this but, at any rate, when prizes were offered this year for the best cheerful and the best serious glee, a step was taken worthy of all praise, and of that which is the sincerest form of praise-imitation. Dr. Hiles's " Hushed in Death " is the composition which carried off first honours in the class " serious," and a right good thing sne pronounce it to be without fear of contradiction. The poetic subJect is elegiac:-Hushed in death the minstrel lies By his tomb bright eyes are weeping. The earth is his pillow, '4 but his soul is with us still," and through all changes he will live in story, unborn millions chanting the praise his strains have won. Here is a wide sweep of feeling from the sadness of death to the grandeur of immortal renown, and Dr. Hiles's music goes with it always ample in, and appropriate of, expression. The first section is an Adagio (B flat), opening solemnly with the male soices in four parts, and so harmonised as here and there to suggest the manner of Spohr:-of the original. Especially interesting is the chorus " Oh, be joyful," with its parts for horns, flutes, oboes, clarionets, and bassoons; and not less so the beautifu} duet, " Be ye sure that the Lord He is God," throughout which a judicious use of the wind instruments gives colour and variety alike charming. But we need not discuss details. Franz is now acknowledged as the prince of musical " restorers," and our duty is done when we have called attention to the works upon which his skill has been lavished. H7cshed zat Desth. A Serious Glee for S.A.T.B., by Henry Hiles, Mus. Doc., Oxorl. Hence, loathed Melvzncholy ! A Cheerful Glee for five voicesf by Henry Lahee. Hmpty Dl¢^ntty. Humorous Glee by Alfred J. Caldicott, Mus. Bac., Cantab. [Novello, Ever and Co.] LET US take this opportunity of thanking the worthy members of the Manchester Gentlemen's Glee Club for doing good suit and service to a distinctively English branch of musical art, not only by promoting a knowledge of works already existing, but by stimulating the produc. tion of others. There are, we are glad to say, many associations throughout the kingdom which keep alive regard for the ancient forms of national song. but beyond this do little or nothing to perpetuate them. The members of those associations should be better advised. They should call to mind the fact that in art as for example, in the case of our English oak, as soon as growth stops decay begins, and that real vitality always implies a power of accretion. We do not know whether the Manchester Gentlemen's Glee Club systematically recognises this but, at any rate, when prizes were offered this year for the best cheerful and the best serious glee, a step was taken worthy of all praise, and of that which is the sincerest form of praise-imitation. Dr. Hiles's " Hushed in Death " is the composition which carried off first honours in the class " serious," and a right good thing sne pronounce it to be without fear of contradiction. The poetic subJect is elegiac:-Hushed in death the minstrel lies By his tomb bright eyes are weeping.
doi:10.2307/3357344 fatcat:kcs4iyzyqrhkjcllc4s446awii