IN-VITRO REGENERATION AND DEVELOPMENT FOR THE CONSERVATION AND PROPAGATION OF TOMATO PLANT (SOLANUM LYCOPERSICUM) AND CURRANT TOMATO (S. PIMPINELLIFOLIUM) FROM TWO DIFFERENT EXPLANTS

M.A. RAZA, A. NAWAZ, M. ALI, M. ZAYNAB, S.T. MUNTHA, S.H.R. ZAIDI, A.R. KHAN, X.-L. ZHENG
2020 Applied Ecology and Environmental Research  
While the contribution of stable tomato cultivars to ecological balance and environmental preservation has been recognized, two tomato cultivars have developed methods for tissue culture. For two tomato cultivars Solanum lycopersicum and Solanum pimpinellifolium, the regeneration capacity of two types of explants (cotyledons and stem node segments) was compared. Explants were cultured on five different regeneration media (½ MS and BAP) for stem node and MS for callus induction with a
more » ... n with a combination of 6benzylaminopurine (BAP) and αnaphthaleneacetic acid (NAA). It was found that ability to regenerate was substantially dependent on both the cultivars and the type of explant. Stem nodes, followed by cotyledons, were the best explants to induce shoot regeneration. It was noticed that the best formulation of the medium for this regeneration from cotyledon explants used was MS with 1 mg/L BAP and MS+1BAP+0.25 NAA mg/L for callus induction in S. pimpinellifolium and for stem node explant the best formulation used was ½ MS and 7 mg/L BAP in S. lycopersicum was observed. All these data raised the possibility that to preserve and propagate wide hybrids of tomato materials in vitro, the regeneration ability of two explants was compared in Solanum lycopersicum and S. pimpinellifolium. Raza et al.: In-vitro regeneration and development for the conservation and propagation of tomato plant and currant tomato from two different explants -880 -APPLIED ECOLOGY AND ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH 18(1):879-888.
doi:10.15666/aeer/1801_879888 fatcat:yh7im4lahbb5lltxzzw267yo34