BLOOD TYPE CLASSIFICATIONS, WITH A SLIGHT MODIFICATION OF TECHNIC

GEORGE R. MOFFITT, GEORGE F. KLUGH, CHESTER E. SHEPARD
1919 Journal of the American Medical Association  
factory method of testing the motility of the stomach. Just one example : Recently a patient came to my office. I took an ordinary test breakfast and to my surprise found present pieces of vegetable eaten at dinner the night before. The patient was then sent for roentgen-ray study and the barium was given. The roentgenologist reported that "the stomach evacuates itself rapidly and is almost completely empty at two hours." Dr. G. A. Friedman, New York: I would like to ask Dr. Stewart whether he
more » ... Stewart whether he has had occasion to examine his patients roentgenographically after their appendixes or gall¬ bladders were removed, and whether the roentgen findings in regard to motility of the gastro-intestinal tract were dif¬ ferent from those found before operation. If the distur¬ bance in motility was due to the diseased appendix or to the diseased gallbladder, normal motility should have estab¬ lished itself after the surgical procedures. If, however, the postoperative roentgen findings were identical with the preoperative findings, it may then be questionable whether the altered motility discovered previous to operation was really due to the pathology in the appendix or gallbladder. May it not be possible, then, that the disturbance in nerves regulating the musculature was the primary factor for the disturbance in motility? Dr. William Howard Barber, New York: In regard to the connections of the extrinsic gastric nerves with "reflex" gastric motility: keeping in mind the anatomy, as Dr.
doi:10.1001/jama.1919.02610500011003 fatcat:cwn2pebxnvdmznt6kuf6zxzjmu