THE DISTRIBUTION IMMUNOGLOBULIN-CONTAINING CELLS AND T LYMPHOCYTE SUBPOPULATIONS IN THE MOUSE MAMMARY GLAND: A MORPHOMETRIC AND IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL STUDY

HAIDER IBRAHIM ISMAIL, YOSHIHARU HASHIMOTO, YASUHIRO KON, AKIHIRO KONNO, HIROSHI YAMAZOE, TOSHIHIKO IWANAGA
1996 Biomedical research  
The distribution of immunoglobulin (Ig)-containing plasma cells and T lymphocyte subpopulations in the mouse mammary gland was studied in different stages of the reproductive cycle using immunohistochemical techniques. Generally, Ig-containing plasma cells (IgA, IgG and IgM) in the mammary gland were few during pregnancy. They gradually increased in number during lactation, further increased in the first 2 days of the post-weaning period, and then quickly decreased. The rich existence of plasma
more » ... existence of plasma cells after the suckling period suggests that their main role is the protection of the mammary gland rather than the transference of passive immunity to neonates. IgA-containing plasma cells were the most frequent isotype, while IgG-and IgM-containing cells were much less throughout the reproductive cycle. In contrast to the plasma cells, T lymphocytes were observed to increase markedly in late pregnancy, while they gradually decreased during lactation, a further decrease being recognizable in the post-weaning period. CD8+ cells, the predominant cell type among T cells, preferentially existed within the epithelia of the alveoli and ducts, whereas CD4+ cells were mainly located in the connective tissue areas. The difference in the dynamics of plasma cells and T lymphocytes suggests that the mammary gland T lymphocytes may lack an isotype-switching role for plasma cells.
doi:10.2220/biomedres.17.105 fatcat:7hjlzczb5vgj7e6hfzvmp6akfy