REPORTS OF CASES OF INSANITY FROM THE INSANE DEPARTMENT OF THE PHILADELPHIA HOSPITAL

PHILIP LEIDY, CHARLES K. MILLS
1887 Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease  
His father is alive and well, and there was never any insanity in the family. His mother was subject to violent attacks of neur¬ algia. He has a sister and brothers alive and well. When about 20 years of age, he states that he had lung trouble, which was shown by night sweats, spitting of blood, loss of flesh, and cough. These symptoms came on gradually, and lasted for several years ; then he apparently recovered, and he has had no relapse. He had an attack of acute rheumatism in 1875. On
more » ... m in 1875. On admission to the hospital, his friends stated that for a long time he had been drinking heavily, and that this attack, which was his first, began with mania a potu about a month before. He was evidently laboring under great fear ; he refused food and was fed with a tube. He attacked all who approached him, cried and wrung his hands, and appeared to be in a frenzy of grief and terror. All his organs seemed to be normal, and no evidences of syphilis were found. Under hydrobromate of hyoscine he slept, and his bowels, which were constipated, were moved by calomel and magnesia sulphate. August 6th.-His condition was unchanged ; he was restless and agitated, and subject to hallucinations of a terrible kind ; he attacked people and hurled maledictions at imaginary individuals. He was sleepless and refused food. His case was diagnosticated as acute melancholia. August 20th.-He was somewhat better. He ate a little, but with evident suspicion, and said somebody wanted to kill him. August 25th.-He was quieter and more rational, and ate better. 46 PARANOIA.
doi:10.1097/00005053-188701000-00005 fatcat:deemzlycafdcpnmcwyphddzdsu