THE INTRODUCTION OF SALARIED INSTRUCTION IN THE TRAINING-SCHOOLS

ANNIE W. GOODRICH
1905 The American Journal of Nursing  
Miss Maxwell thought the lack of economy in food and supplies was due mainly to the members of the house staff-the young men who really give the orders, but in most instances know nothing of the cost of the materials. Miss Davis thought that both the hospital managers and the nurses were powerless when the members of the medical staff insisted upon a policy of extravagance. While there were notable instances here and there of nurses being at fault, it did not rest with the nurses whether the
more » ... rses whether the hospital was run extravagantly or not. It was the consensus of opinion of a number of speakers that while nurses were undoubtedly wasteful in small ways the fault waB largely one of extravagance in construction of buildings without due regard to convenience of administration, undue outlay in costly equipment, un¬ reasonable demands for service, extravagance in the use of supplies of all kinds, all of these conditions being the result of the requirements of the medical staff. [We regret that Miss Alline's paper, " Training-School Libraries, Scholar¬ ships, Loan Funds, and Tuition Fees," is not ready for publication, but it will appear in a later number. -Ed.]
doi:10.1097/00000446-190506000-00005 fatcat:3lz223ysr5h3tnzkfadoycih6a