Blockade of NK-1 receptors in the lateral commissural nucleus tractus solitarii of awake rats had no effect on the cardiovascular responses to chemoreflex activation

C. Zhang, L.G.H. Bonagamba, B.H. Machado
2000 Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research  
The neurotransmission of the chemoreflex in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS), particularly of the sympatho-excitatory component, is not completely understood. There is evidence that substance P may play a role in the neurotransmission of the chemoreflex in the NTS. Microinjection of substance P (50 pmol/50 nl, N = 12, and 5 nmol/50 nl, N = 8) into the commissural NTS of unanesthetized rats produced a significant increase in mean arterial pressure (101 ± 1 vs 108 ± 2 and 107 ± 3 vs 115 ± 4
more » ... 7 ± 3 vs 115 ± 4 mmHg, respectively) and no significant changes in heart rate (328 ± 11 vs 347 ± 15 and 332 ± 7 vs 349 ± 13 bpm, respectively) 2 min after microinjection. Previous treatment with WIN, an NK-1 receptor antagonist (2.5 nmol/50 nl), microinjected into the NTS of a specific group of rats, blocked the pressor (11 ± 5 vs 1 ± 2 mmHg) and tachycardic (31 ± 6 vs 4 ± 3 bpm) responses to substance P (50 pmol/50 nl, N = 5) observed 10 min after microinjection. Bilateral microinjection of WIN into the lateral commissural NTS (N = 8) had no significant effect on the pressor (50 ± 4 vs 42 ± 6 mmHg) or bradycardic (-230 ± 16 vs -220 ± 36 bpm) responses to chemoreflex activation with potassium cyanide (iv). These data indicate that the activation of NK-1 receptors by substance P in the NTS produces an increase in baseline mean arterial pressure and heart rate. However, the data obtained with WIN suggest that substance P and NK-1 receptors do not play a major role in the neurotransmission of the chemoreflex in the lateral commissural NTS.
doi:10.1590/s0100-879x2000001100018 pmid:11050671 fatcat:xfnsun3qm5fbzouvcszrrgvnca