A School Latin Grammar. Morris H. Morgan

Isaac B. Burgess
1900 The School Review  
The arrangement is in the main equally satisfactory. Minor details of biography, along with much other matter, are compressed into concise footnotes, leaving room in the text for the more salient facts of life history and for critical estimates. The appendix contains extracts from the early literature; brief articles on early newspapers and magazines; a partial bibliography of colonial and Revolutionary literature; and a reference list of books and articles. The last is not well arranged: it
more » ... ell arranged: it would have been better to give each title a paragraph and arrange either chronologically or alphabetically. As it is, however, the bibliography is remarkably full, and, so far as we have tested it, accurate. On p. 345 we fail to find Col. T. W. Higginson's Contemporaries (Boston, I899). Schinbach's Gesammelte Aufsdtze zur neueren Litteratur in Deutschland, Osterreich, Amerika, which probably appeared too recently to be included, may be added to p. 346. The proportion of the book, too, is good. While the leading writers are fully discussed, the author finds room to speak of a larger number of minor authors than are usually mentioned in a book of this size. This has its advantages, even in a highschool history of literature; for the student cannot fail to be impressed with the abundance of our literature as well as by the inferiority of much of it. Some omissions, however, have been noted: Elisha Mulford, author of The Nationdeserve at least mention. Eugene Field, too (p. 285), was something more than a writer of child poems. Yet these are minor faults; and Mr. Bronson's criticism is careful, rarely extravagant, and, we believe, generally sound. Few misprints have been noted: Lanier was born in I842 (p. 287); on p. 345, line 2 f. b., read F. L. Knowles; on p. 368, read M. N. Murfree. Professor Johnson's brief sketch includes interesting descriptions of a few leading authors and some well chosen extracts. His own criticism he has supplemented by slicing up Lowell's Fable for Critics. Since this poem can be easily procured by itself, we can hardly approve of this use of several pages. It is difficult, too, to justify the order of treatment: why should Cooper precede Brockden Brown, or E. R. Sill precede Boker ? Still, the author's criticism, as far as it goes, is good. Fuller bibliographical details would have increased the value of the book. Professor Hart's interesting sketch of American historiography, though written from the point of view of the historian, deserves the attention of students of literature as a concise description of the efforts of Americans, from Bradford to Rhodes, to tell the story of our past, or to discuss themes closely related to the history of America. The arrangement is in the main equally satisfactory. Minor details of biography, along with much other matter, are compressed into concise footnotes, leaving room in the text for the more salient facts of life history and for critical estimates. The appendix contains extracts from the early literature; brief articles on early newspapers and magazines; a partial bibliography of colonial and Revolutionary literature; and a reference list of books and articles. The last is not well arranged: it would have been better to give each title a paragraph and arrange either chronologically or alphabetically. As it is, however, the bibliography is remarkably full, and, so far as we have tested it, accurate. On p. 345 we fail to find Col. T. W. Higginson's Contemporaries (Boston, I899). Schinbach's Gesammelte Aufsdtze zur neueren Litteratur in Deutschland, Osterreich, Amerika, which probably appeared too recently to be included, may be added to p. 346. The proportion of the book, too, is good. While the leading writers are fully discussed, the author finds room to speak of a larger number of minor authors than are usually mentioned in a book of this size. This has its advantages, even in a highschool history of literature; for the student cannot fail to be impressed with the abundance of our literature as well as by the inferiority of much of it. Some omissions, however, have been noted: Elisha Mulford, author of The Nationdeserve at least mention. Eugene Field, too (p. 285), was something more than a writer of child poems. Yet these are minor faults; and Mr. Bronson's criticism is careful, rarely extravagant, and, we believe, generally sound. Few misprints have been noted: Lanier was born in I842 (p. 287); on p. 345, line 2 f. b., read F. L. Knowles; on p. 368, read M. N. Murfree. Professor Johnson's brief sketch includes interesting descriptions of a few leading authors and some well chosen extracts. His own criticism he has supplemented by slicing up Lowell's Fable for Critics. Since this poem can be easily procured by itself, we can hardly approve of this use of several pages. It is difficult, too, to justify the order of treatment: why should Cooper precede Brockden Brown, or E. R. Sill precede Boker ? Still, the author's criticism, as far as it goes, is good. Fuller bibliographical details would have increased the value of the book. Professor Hart's interesting sketch of American historiography, though written from the point of view of the historian, deserves the attention of students of literature as a concise description of the efforts of Americans, from Bradford to Rhodes, to tell the story of our past, or to discuss themes closely related to the history of America.
doi:10.1086/434184 fatcat:dpuahvbv4fdajid3jumnd6vnim